New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 44 & 45 – Final Episodes in Series

Christ-Foot Washing-Hosios Loukas-Narthex-North Wall-PCA
Jesus Washing the Disciples’ Feet.  Mosaic, Hosios Loukas Monastery, Distomo, Boaetia region, Greece.  Photo by Ed88. Public Domain, CC-by-SA 3.0.  No date was provided by vendor.  The Monastery was built in the 10th C. honoring a monastic saint, the Venerable Luke of Steiris. I applied perspective correction to the original image.

It has been a challenge and a pleasure to work on the upgrades to the AIC Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels.  For more than a year I have been occupied with finding new historic images, improving the content, especially filling out the Scriptural quotations in the original version, fixing errors in spelling and syntax and other shortcomings, and, finally, making the series compatible with all the other series now offered through links on this site.

Now, just days before the start of another Church Year on First Sunday in Advent, I complete the upgrades with the final two episodes, Episode Forty-four and Episode Forty-five.  They are focused on five unique events in the Gospel of John:  the Visit of Nicodemus; the Restoration of the Adulterous Woman; Foot Washing on Maundy Thursday; the institution of the Sacrament of Penance/Confession; and, finally, Jesus’ Seaside Post-Resurrection Breakfast with the remaining Disciples.

Watch: Episode Forty-four.      Listen: Podcast – Episode Forty-four.

Watch: Episode Forty-five.       Listen: Podcast – Episode Forty-five.

I have in mind several projects for A.D. 2020, but am not ready to provide details.

Please consider sharing this blog with friends, family and others interested in traditional Anglican liturgy and study.

As always, thank you for you interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 40 to 43

Christ-Last Supper-Codex_Bruchsal_1_28r
The Last Supper  Codex Bruchsal, circa 1220 A.D., also called the Evangelistar von Speyer, after the Cathedral for which it was made.  The top panel shows St. John leaning upon Jesus’ breast and the disloyal Judas separated from the others in the lower left side.   The bottom panel has two scenes of Jesus washing the feet of the Disciples, with St. Peter in the right hand panel, his hand to his head in the manner described by St. John (“It is he to whom I shall give a piece of bread when I have dipped it” John 13:26a).  The image is also published in Wikipedia Commons under the CCo (non-commerical) license.

Contininuing toward final completion of the upgrading of the New Testament: Gospels Bible Study Video series, this week I offer you information about four more episodes, which are the 2nd through 5th in a series of 7 on Unique Themes, Details and Events.  Episode Forty continues my discussion of Unique Themes, with more on Light vs. Darkness; Good vs. Evil; Truth vs. Falsehood; the Emotions of Jesus, shown in four examples; Numerology; St. Jobn’s frequest use of “the Jews”; and Jesus’ prophecies.  In Episode Forty-one the focus shifts to unique mentions of Places and People: Cana, Samaria, the Samaritan Woman at the Well, Thomas, Nathanael, Philip & Andrew,and  the Father-Son relationship.  In Episode Forty-two  the focus is on unique references to Peter, Nicodemus, Judas Iscariot, and Mary Magdalene.  Finally, in Episode Forty-three, the unique subjects are the Sanhedrin Plot, the New Commandment, the lack of an “agony in the garden” scene, Jesus’ use of “lift up” or “lifted up” in reference to the Son of Man, and, finally, Jesus’ use of concepts of time, beginning with “hour”, from the Greek hora.  The discussion continues into the next episode.

This week the competition of featured illustration was again close, between the Arrest of Jesus from the Codex Egberti, a mosaic of St. Peter at St. Michael’s Golden-domed Monastery at Kiev, and the Last Supper from the Codex Bruchsal, made in Cologne region of Germany around 1220 A.D.  The latter was the winner, owing to its spectacular use of color and complexity of detail based on  Chapter 13 in the Gospel of St. John.

Watch: Episode Forty.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty.

Watch: Episode Forty-one.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty-one.

Watch: Episode Forty-two.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty-two.

Watch: Episode Forty-three.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty-three.

The final two episodes, Forty-four and Forty-five, are complete and will be the subject of the blog entry for the week of Nov. 24th.

The graphics on most of the pages on this site have been upgraded and, hopefully, the persistent glitches of unwanted blank lines removed.   These do not seem to want to go away no matter how many times the files are corrected.

I am working on another project but am not yet ready to declare whether it will be completed.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 36 to 39 – the Seven Signs

Christ-Raising of Lazarus-Church in Mistra_001
The Raising of Lazarus, fresco, 15th C. A.D., Pantanassa Church, Mistra, Greece, from the Yorck Project:  10,000 Masterworks.

Moving along rapidly toward completing the updating of our Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels, this week I bring you four more episodes, all focused on the Seven Signs in the Gospel of St. John plus additional unique material.  St. John makes an interesting distinction, referring to these seven events, five of which are unique to the Gospel of John, as “signs” from the Greek semeion.  I explain the theories of why in the video series.  Episode Thirty-six is focused exclusively on the Wedding at Cana, “This beginning of signs Jesus did in Cana of Galilee, and manifested His glory, and His disciples believed in Him” (John 2:11).   Episode Thirty-seven includes the Healing of the Nobleman’s Son (John 4:46-54); the Healing of the Paralytic Man (John 5:1-1-15); and Pt 1 of 2 on the Healing of the Man Born Blind (John 9:1-41).  Episode Thirty-eight completes my discussion of the five unique signs with the Healing of the Man Born Blind (Pt 2 of 2) and the Raising of Lazarus (John 11:38-43).  Episode Thirty-nine includes discussion of the two signs which are also reported with slightly different details in one or more of the Synoptic Gospels: the Feeding of the 5,000 (John 6:1-14) and the Walking on Water (John 6:15-21), followed by the Part 1 of 7 on Unique Themes, Details and Events in the Gospel of John, starting with the spiritual themes of Light vs. Darkness, Good vs. Evil; Truth vs. Falsehood; Life vs. Death; Heaven vs. Earth; moving on to the first of Unique Details: the Emotions of Jesus; Numerology in the Gospel of John; John’s extensive use of “Jews”; and Prophecy.

Once again, the choice of the featured image was difficult, since there are a great many amazing images in these four episodes.   The contest ended in a draw.   The first, above, used in Episode Thirty-eight, is a 15th C. fresco, the Raising of Lazarus, Pantanassa Church, Mistra, Greece, from the DVD collection known as the Yorck Project more commonly called 10,000 Masterworks.  The photograph was taken more than 15 years ago and one hopes that restoration, or at least, active preservation techniques, have halted the deterioration of this remarkable image.   It’s rival in the Western Church tradition is Duccio di Buoninsegna’s egg tempera and gold on panel work, produced between 1310 and 1311 A.D. at Siena, Italy, from the Kimball Art Museum, Ft. Worth, TX.

Christ-Raising_of_Lazarus-Duccio_di_Buoninsegna,_1310–11)
The Raising of Lazarus, egg tempera and gilt on panel, Duccio di Buoninsegna, 1310-1311 A.D., Kimball Art Museum, Ft. Worth, TX.

Watch: Episode Thirty-six.    Listen: Podcast-Episode Thirty-six.

Watch: Episode Thirty-seven.   Listen: Podcast-Episode Thirty-seven.

Watch: Episode Thirty-eight.    Listen:Podcast-Episode Thirty-eight.

Watch:  Episode Thirty-nine.    Listen: Podcast-Episode Thirty-nine.

In the week of Nov. 17th my focus will be on Episode Forty to Episode Forty-three, which include Parts 2 through 5 of seven on Unique Themes, Details and Events in the Gospel of St. John.

During the week of Nov. 24th my focus will be on the final two episodes, Episode Forty-four and Episode Forty-five, the last of which is focused on five unique events in the Gospel of St. John plus a summary of the entire series.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

New Testament: Gospels-Episode Nineteen

After a short delay in production, Episode Nineteen in the revised editions of our Bible Study Video series, New Tesament: Gospels, is now online.  It runs just over 21 minutes, with a superb and very vivid early 11th C. illumination on the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus presented in 3 tiers.  The featured illustration, since I have used the Rich Man and Lazarus illumination in previous years, is a 16th C. restoration of much older fresco from Bulgaria.

Rich Man and Lazarus-Rila-PCA2
The Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus  Fresco, Monastery of St. Ivan of Rila, nr. Sofia,
Bulgaria.  Started 927 A.D.; Destroyed by Moslems, early 15th C.; Rebuilt late 15th C. 
Perspective correction and other adjustments applied.  Photo by Apostoloff  Creative Commons CC-by-SA 3.0.

Watch the video.         Listen to the Podcast.

I’ve been very busy completing the updating of the final episoses of the Gospel of  St. John.  Episode Forty-five should be complete by the end of the week or early next week.  It includes several illuminations I had not seen previously.

As always, thanks for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!   Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

New Testament Videos – Episode 18

Christ-in Majesty-Ms Royal 1 D X-Fol8v-BritLibr-PCA
Christ in Majesty.  Produced before 1220 A.D., Oxford, England.  Ms. Royal 1 D X, Folio 8v, British Library, London, England.  CCo license applies.

Episode Eighteen in the revised and expanded version of New Testament: Gospels is now available in video and podcast formats.  The episode is focused on the next three unique parable: the Lost Coin, the Lost Son (or Prodigal Son in the KJV) and the Unjust Steward.   This week’s favored graphic is a wonderful blue and red themed Christ in Majesty, which is the Western Church term for what the Eastern Church labels as Christ Pantokrator.  Christ is seated on a the throne of judgment within the traditional almond-shaped mandorla, which signifies the Glory of the Lord.  At each corner is a symbol of one of the Gospel authors.  It is an illumination in colored inks and gold on parchment from a Psalter made at Oxford in the 1st Qtr 13th C. A.D. but definitely before 1220 A.D.  I used perspective correction software on the original image.

Watch the Video.      Listen to the Podcast

I am currently completing the revisions to Episode Forty-two in the same series.   Episode Forty-two is focused on Unique Details – People, including Peter, Nicodemus, Judas Iscariot and Mary Madgalene.  The final slides as yet unedited are those about Mary Magdalene.  I have the text but haven’t decided upon the right illustrations.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Please consider becoming a follower by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church tab in the right column.

May the Lord bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Gospel of St. Luke – Episode 17

Christ-In Majesty-MS_Cotton_Galba_A_XVIII,_f._21r-Alt1-96dpi

Episode Seventeen in New Testament: Gospels is now available, a week later than expected owing to competing demands on my time.  The episode is focused on the first four of the Unique Parables in the Gospel of St, Luke, in order of appearance:  Good Samaritan, Rich Fool, Withered Fig Tree & Chief Seats.

This week’s featured illumination, used with the Parable of the Chief Seats, is Christ in Majesty, depicting Jesus seated on the throne of the New Jerusalem, surrounded by a chorus of virgins, martyrs and confessors, with the Greek symbols for Alpha and Omega and a Cross beside Him and a visible wound in His side.  It comes from the British Library’s Ms. Cotton Galba A XVIII, Folio 21v, in the Athelstan Psalter, made in or near Liege, Belgium, around 924 A.D. for the Bishop of Winchester and later given to the English king of Wessex, Athelstan.  The very large collection of manuscripts collected by Robert Cotton are only recently being digitized.

Watch the Video.    Listen to the Podcast.

I am currently working on the slides and text for Episode Forty-one, focused on Unique Details in the Gospel of St. John.  My timetable has been revised and I now hope to complete the remaining four episodes and add a new, final/summary episode before the end of the year.

As always, thanks for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

Bible Study Videos: Episode Sixteen

Christ-Temptations-All-Echternach-96dpi

Episode Sixteen in the revised and expanded versions of our Bible Study Video series, The New Testament: Gospels, is now available in video and podcast versions.  The topics are St. Luke’s unique reverse order genealogy of Jesus and his account of the Temptations of Christ.   The graphic with this Blog post is a 96 dpi version of the Temptations from the Codex Aureus of Echternach, made at the Abbey of Echternach, Echternach, Luxembourg (then part of Germany) between 1030 and 1050 A.D.  The Codex is one of the marvels of the Ottonian era of the rulers of the Holy Roman Empire revived in 800 A.D. by Charlemagne.  It is just one of three scenes on a single page, with other scenes of the Calling of the first Apostles and Cleansing the Temple.   You can see shine in the gilt in the 300 dpi version in the video.  Other illustrations include work by Ducci di Bouninsegna; an miniature of Christ and Satan from a Psalter from England in the 13th C.; an illumination of Luke writing his Gospel made for Charlemagne in 800 A.D.; two watercolors, one of the Temptation on the pinnacle of the Temple and one of St. Joseph, by James Tissot; an oil on canvas of the Temptations by Vassily Surikov, and a scene from an icon in the Russian Orthodox tradition.

Watch the Video       Listen to the Podcast

I am currently working on Episode Thirty-six on the first “sign” in the Gospel of John, the Wedding at Cana.   I am also working on a plan for advertising on an Anglican site for our Bookstore Publications.

As always, thanks for your interest and support.  With my 77th birthday coming up I need encouragement!  Please consider becoming a follower by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church tab in the righthand column or otherwise sharing the site with others.

May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Bible Study Videos – Episode Fifteen


Christ-Baptism-Hitda Codex-Folio3aEpisode Fifteen in the revised and expanded version of our Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels, is now online in video and podcast versions.  Topics are St. Luke’s unique boyhood narrative and the baptism of Christ.  There are 10 illustrations from the 11th, 12th, 16th, 19th and early 20th C.  I’ve chosen the oldest, an Ottonian-era illumination of the Baptism of Christ from the Hitda Codex, named for the Abbess of Meschede, Germany and made circa 1020 A.D. in the Cologne region.   It includes imaginative coloration and decoration, with a starry sky, a fish-filled river Jordan, and a heaven-sent dove.  I hope a viewer can tell me what the recumbent figure at lower right represents.  The original is in the Hessische Landesbibliotek, Darmstadt, Germany, but this version came from the Yorck Project’s 10,000 Masterworks DVD.

Watch the video.      Listen to the Podcast version.

Episode Sixteen in this series should be available next week.  The slides and text are complete but there is, as yet, no soundtrack.

I am currently working on Episode Thirty-five, the last in a series of 7 episodes on the I Am declarations in the Gospel of John.  I have found some great illustrations for the rebuilding of the episodes on St. John’s Gospel.

Please consider following the blog by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church tab at right.  We don’t share email addresses with anyone.

As always, thanks for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

Bible Study Videos: Episode Fourteen

Luke-with Symbol-2nd Version- Gospel of Otto III
Luke the Evangelist with his traditional symbol, the Ox, an illumination strongly influenced by the Byzantine-style, from THE GOSPELS OF OTTO III, made at the Benedictine Monastery on Reichenau Island, Lake Constance, Southern Germany, in the mid-11th C. The original is at the Bavarian State Library, Munich, Germany.  Public Domain (Yorck Project: 10,000 Masterworks).

Episode Fourteen is the 3rd in the New Testament: Gospels Bible Study Video series to be focused on the Gospel of St. Luke.  Topics include more on the Nativity, with special emphasis on the third angelic “annunciation,” this time to the shepherds; the last 2 of 4 unique songs in the Gospel of St. Luke, the Magnificat and the Nunc dimittis; plus the prophecies of Simeon and Anna.  The episode includes 8 illuminations in colors and gold on parchment from the 11th C. and 3 from the 13th C.; 2 frescoes from the 13th C. and one from the 14th C.; a spectacular mosaic of the Holy Family registering according to the decree of Quirinius from the 1st Qtr, 14th C. near Constantinople/Istanbul; 1 enamel from the 15th C.; 1 oil on canvas from the 15th C; and 2 watercolors from the 19th C.  Nearly all of these are not widely-seen.  They were found in recently-digitized collections in England, Germany, Italy, Spain and Asia Minor.  I hope viewers enjoy seeing these inspiring works of faith as much as I have enjoyed searching archives to find appropriate images and help them into public view on the Web.

Watch the Video on our YouTube channel.              Listen to the Podcast hosted on our Podbean channel.

It was difficult to decide which illustration to include in this Blog posting,  The one which really sums up the concept of “behold” as used by St. Luke is from the Gospels of Otto III, one of the Holy Roman Emperors who followed in the line of Charlemagne, crowned HRE at Rome in 800 A.D.  I used it in a blog posting in June A.D. 2018.  The work was painted at the Reichenau monastery, Reichenau, Germany, the same facility where the Bamberg Apocalypse was made between 1000 and 1020 A.D.  Everything the reader/viewer should “behold” flows fantastically above St. Luke’s head in nearly every color imaginable, but especially red and yellow.  The original is at the Bavarian State Library, Munich, Germany.  This image came from the Yorck Project: 10,000 Masterworks, made available on a DVD in the early 21st C.

Meanwhile I have been continuing to work on Episode Thirty-two and Episode Thirty-three, on the Gospel of St. John.  My wife, Corkie, and I did take time off to celebrate our 47th anniversary with a trip to Roanoke and Lexington, VA.  We paid homage to Roanoke’s famed Black Dog Salvage, bringing home two pieces of furniture.  We enjoyed our stay at the Robert E. Lee Hotel and dinner at the Southern Inn Restaurant (directly across Main St. from the hotel).  Corkie drove the entire length of the Blue Ridge Parkway between Roanoke and Afton Mountain/Rockfish Gap, west of Charlottesville.  The views from the many lookouts across the Shenadoah Valley were truly spectacular.  I must not leave out our lunch visit to another Roanoke landmark, The New Yorker Delicatessen and Restaurant on Williamson Road where I had a real Reuben and Corkie feasted on a liverwurst (the real thing) on rye.

Thank you for your interest and support.  Please consider sharing your knowledge of this site with others.  You can subscribe by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church tab.

As always, may God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Bible Study Videos – Episode Thirteen

Annunciation-Meister_der_Braunschweig-Magdeburger_Schule_1275
THE ANNUNCIATION.  The Archangel Gabriel and the Blessed Virgin presented in tempera and gilt on vellum, circa 1275 A.D., attributed to the Master of the Braunschweig-Magdeburg School, from the Austrian National Library, Vienna, Austria, as reproduced in The Yorck Project: 10,000 Masterworks. Public domain.

In what I think is the best episode yet in the revised and expanded version of the AIC Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels is now available.  Episode Thirteen features many rarely-seen illustrations from the 11th, 13th, 18th, 19th and 2nd Qtr 20th C. to aid in viewer/listener comprehension of the Gospel of St. Luke.

Watch the Video.          Listen to the Podcast

The focus in Episode Thirteen is on the second and best known of three “annunciations” in the Gospel of St Luke, in this case “The” Annunciation to the Blessed Virgin by the Archangel Gabriel; the first two of 4 songs in the Gospel of St. Luke, the Magnificat and the Benedictus, the latter occasioned by the birth of John the Baptist and the loosening of the tongue of Zacharias.

Personally, I really miss the congregational singing of the Benedictus (as well as the Jubilate Deo and the Te Deum laudamus).  No musical instrument, no matter how well played can equal the emotional feeling of united voices singing the theological songs.

I have completed both the sound and pictures for Episode Fourteen and will complete the video and upload it next week.  I am currently prepared the slides and script for Episode Thirty-two, on the Gospel of St. John.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

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