The Gospel of John: Annotated & Illustrated

Gospel of John-Cover-144.jpg

Today I happily make public the status of a new book project: The Gospel of John: Annotated & Illustrated.  The format and size will be the same or similar to that used for Revelation: an Idealist Interpretation and The Writing Prophets of the Old Testaments.    The Gospel text will be the NKJV version, printed in 14 pt type in Adobe Trajan Pro, a easy-to-read digital serif font created for Adobe by Carol Twombly in 1989.  The Annotations will be printed in 12 pt type in Adobe Caslon Pro, a modern serif type based upon a face created in England by William Caslon in the mid-18th C.    Citations from quoted Scripture used within the Annotations will be set in 11 pt. type with deeper inset on both the right and left than the original use.

Gospel of John-First Chapter Proof-p11-96dpi
Illustration: Copyright Duchessart|Alamy Stock Photo, Inc.

The working copy of the first chapter at left gives an indication of the book’s look.  The illustration, for the first page of Chapter 1, is a 13th C. mosaic from the Genesis dome at the Basilica of St. Mark, Venice, Italy.  Depicted are two scenes: left, Separating the Light from the Darkness; right, Setting the Firmament.  The Byzantine-style Basilica was completed in the 9th C., with many additions made in later centuries.

John’s Gospel is a book like no other in the New Testament, offering a first hand account of many events not mentioned in the Synoptic Gospels.  Because it was dictated to a scribe, traditionally said to be Prochorus, later Bishop of Ephesus, when read aloud, it has the cadence of a private lecture offering a glimpse into the tumultous final three years in the earthly life of Jesus Christ.  My objective in designing, researching and producing the book will be to let 21st C. readers have their own copy of a Gospel book with the colorful array of imagery used by Christians since the beginning of the 5th C. to pass along to later generations the stories told in John’s Gospel.  Such an experience was once only possible for the very rich and powerful both inside and outside the Church.

As currently imagined, the finished work will run about 200 plus pages, printed in paperback in full colour.  As currently planned, there will also be a digital version made available in Kindle format.   Although the research is mostly complete, based upon the twenty revised and expanded episodes in the AIC Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels, there is no timetable for this project.   There are technical and legal issues to resolve, as well as decisions about the format of Chapters 6, 7, and 8.  These chapters are mostly an extended  — and often heated — dialogue between Jesus and the group of Pharisees, Chief Priests and scribes who followed Him wherever He went, hopeful of catching Him out in saying something they could use against Him.  Earlier generations of illustrators suffered from the same problem, with the result that there are almost no images available between the Feeding of the Multitudes/Calming the Seas/Walking on the Sea in the first half of Chapter 6 and the Healing of the Man Born Blind at the start of Chapter 9.  These dialogues include several of the “I Am” declarations (Bread of Life; Living Bread; Light of the World; and Before Abraham Was, I Am), which I discussed in Episodes Twenty-nine to Thirty-five in the New Testament Bible Study series.  I have been searching the archives of known sources of  illuminated Gospels, lectionaries and private devotionals looking for suitable images.

Illustrations will be chosen from the AIC’s investory of public domain images gathered from around the world from public domain sources and royalty-free photographic services.   They will include mosaics, frescoes, icons, engravings, paintings, enamels, watercolors, charcoal sketches, altarpieces and photographs.   The precious resources from which the images were chosen have been digitized and made available to the public for the first time just in the last decade.   The oldest image is a mosaic from the early 5th C.  The “newest” image is a 2nd Qtr 20th C. stained glass window from the AIC Bookstore Publication Paintings on Light: the Stained Glass Windows of St. Joseph’s Villa Chapel.  

In other news, I will be changing my email address.  The new address is frron.aic@earthlink.net.  This completes the final transition away from references to my former parish which is now closed.   The current email address will remain active until late in the 1st Qtr, A.D. 2020.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God continue to bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!

Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 44 & 45 – Final Episodes in Series

Christ-Foot Washing-Hosios Loukas-Narthex-North Wall-PCA
Jesus Washing the Disciples’ Feet.  Mosaic, Hosios Loukas Monastery, Distomo, Boaetia region, Greece.  Photo by Ed88. Public Domain, CC-by-SA 3.0.  No date was provided by vendor.  The Monastery was built in the 10th C. honoring a monastic saint, the Venerable Luke of Steiris. I applied perspective correction to the original image.

It has been a challenge and a pleasure to work on the upgrades to the AIC Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels.  For more than a year I have been occupied with finding new historic images, improving the content, especially filling out the Scriptural quotations in the original version, fixing errors in spelling and syntax and other shortcomings, and, finally, making the series compatible with all the other series now offered through links on this site.

Now, just days before the start of another Church Year on First Sunday in Advent, I complete the upgrades with the final two episodes, Episode Forty-four and Episode Forty-five.  They are focused on five unique events in the Gospel of John:  the Visit of Nicodemus; the Restoration of the Adulterous Woman; Foot Washing on Maundy Thursday; the institution of the Sacrament of Penance/Confession; and, finally, Jesus’ Seaside Post-Resurrection Breakfast with the remaining Disciples.

Watch: Episode Forty-four.      Listen: Podcast – Episode Forty-four.

Watch: Episode Forty-five.       Listen: Podcast – Episode Forty-five.

I have in mind several projects for A.D. 2020, but am not ready to provide details.

Please consider sharing this blog with friends, family and others interested in traditional Anglican liturgy and study.

As always, thank you for you interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 40 to 43

Christ-Last Supper-Codex_Bruchsal_1_28r
The Last Supper  Codex Bruchsal, circa 1220 A.D., also called the Evangelistar von Speyer, after the Cathedral for which it was made.  The top panel shows St. John leaning upon Jesus’ breast and the disloyal Judas separated from the others in the lower left side.   The bottom panel has two scenes of Jesus washing the feet of the Disciples, with St. Peter in the right hand panel, his hand to his head in the manner described by St. John (“It is he to whom I shall give a piece of bread when I have dipped it” John 13:26a).  The image is also published in Wikipedia Commons under the CCo (non-commerical) license.

Contininuing toward final completion of the upgrading of the New Testament: Gospels Bible Study Video series, this week I offer you information about four more episodes, which are the 2nd through 5th in a series of 7 on Unique Themes, Details and Events.  Episode Forty continues my discussion of Unique Themes, with more on Light vs. Darkness; Good vs. Evil; Truth vs. Falsehood; the Emotions of Jesus, shown in four examples; Numerology; St. Jobn’s frequest use of “the Jews”; and Jesus’ prophecies.  In Episode Forty-one the focus shifts to unique mentions of Places and People: Cana, Samaria, the Samaritan Woman at the Well, Thomas, Nathanael, Philip & Andrew,and  the Father-Son relationship.  In Episode Forty-two  the focus is on unique references to Peter, Nicodemus, Judas Iscariot, and Mary Magdalene.  Finally, in Episode Forty-three, the unique subjects are the Sanhedrin Plot, the New Commandment, the lack of an “agony in the garden” scene, Jesus’ use of “lift up” or “lifted up” in reference to the Son of Man, and, finally, Jesus’ use of concepts of time, beginning with “hour”, from the Greek hora.  The discussion continues into the next episode.

This week the competition of featured illustration was again close, between the Arrest of Jesus from the Codex Egberti, a mosaic of St. Peter at St. Michael’s Golden-domed Monastery at Kiev, and the Last Supper from the Codex Bruchsal, made in Cologne region of Germany around 1220 A.D.  The latter was the winner, owing to its spectacular use of color and complexity of detail based on  Chapter 13 in the Gospel of St. John.

Watch: Episode Forty.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty.

Watch: Episode Forty-one.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty-one.

Watch: Episode Forty-two.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty-two.

Watch: Episode Forty-three.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty-three.

The final two episodes, Forty-four and Forty-five, are complete and will be the subject of the blog entry for the week of Nov. 24th.

The graphics on most of the pages on this site have been upgraded and, hopefully, the persistent glitches of unwanted blank lines removed.   These do not seem to want to go away no matter how many times the files are corrected.

I am working on another project but am not yet ready to declare whether it will be completed.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 36 to 39 – the Seven Signs

Christ-Raising of Lazarus-Church in Mistra_001
The Raising of Lazarus, fresco, 15th C. A.D., Pantanassa Church, Mistra, Greece, from the Yorck Project:  10,000 Masterworks.

Moving along rapidly toward completing the updating of our Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels, this week I bring you four more episodes, all focused on the Seven Signs in the Gospel of St. John plus additional unique material.  St. John makes an interesting distinction, referring to these seven events, five of which are unique to the Gospel of John, as “signs” from the Greek semeion.  I explain the theories of why in the video series.  Episode Thirty-six is focused exclusively on the Wedding at Cana, “This beginning of signs Jesus did in Cana of Galilee, and manifested His glory, and His disciples believed in Him” (John 2:11).   Episode Thirty-seven includes the Healing of the Nobleman’s Son (John 4:46-54); the Healing of the Paralytic Man (John 5:1-1-15); and Pt 1 of 2 on the Healing of the Man Born Blind (John 9:1-41).  Episode Thirty-eight completes my discussion of the five unique signs with the Healing of the Man Born Blind (Pt 2 of 2) and the Raising of Lazarus (John 11:38-43).  Episode Thirty-nine includes discussion of the two signs which are also reported with slightly different details in one or more of the Synoptic Gospels: the Feeding of the 5,000 (John 6:1-14) and the Walking on Water (John 6:15-21), followed by the Part 1 of 7 on Unique Themes, Details and Events in the Gospel of John, starting with the spiritual themes of Light vs. Darkness, Good vs. Evil; Truth vs. Falsehood; Life vs. Death; Heaven vs. Earth; moving on to the first of Unique Details: the Emotions of Jesus; Numerology in the Gospel of John; John’s extensive use of “Jews”; and Prophecy.

Once again, the choice of the featured image was difficult, since there are a great many amazing images in these four episodes.   The contest ended in a draw.   The first, above, used in Episode Thirty-eight, is a 15th C. fresco, the Raising of Lazarus, Pantanassa Church, Mistra, Greece, from the DVD collection known as the Yorck Project more commonly called 10,000 Masterworks.  The photograph was taken more than 15 years ago and one hopes that restoration, or at least, active preservation techniques, have halted the deterioration of this remarkable image.   It’s rival in the Western Church tradition is Duccio di Buoninsegna’s egg tempera and gold on panel work, produced between 1310 and 1311 A.D. at Siena, Italy, from the Kimball Art Museum, Ft. Worth, TX.

Christ-Raising_of_Lazarus-Duccio_di_Buoninsegna,_1310–11)
The Raising of Lazarus, egg tempera and gilt on panel, Duccio di Buoninsegna, 1310-1311 A.D., Kimball Art Museum, Ft. Worth, TX.

Watch: Episode Thirty-six.    Listen: Podcast-Episode Thirty-six.

Watch: Episode Thirty-seven.   Listen: Podcast-Episode Thirty-seven.

Watch: Episode Thirty-eight.    Listen:Podcast-Episode Thirty-eight.

Watch:  Episode Thirty-nine.    Listen: Podcast-Episode Thirty-nine.

In the week of Nov. 17th my focus will be on Episode Forty to Episode Forty-three, which include Parts 2 through 5 of seven on Unique Themes, Details and Events in the Gospel of St. John.

During the week of Nov. 24th my focus will be on the final two episodes, Episode Forty-four and Episode Forty-five, the last of which is focused on five unique events in the Gospel of St. John plus a summary of the entire series.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 26 & 27

NT-Gospels-Title1-revEpisode Twenty-six and Episode Twenty-seven, the first of twenty focused on the Gospel of St. John in the AIC Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels, were uploaded this week.  In Episode Twenty-six I explore the history, authorship & themes and offer some suggestions on how to read the Gospel of St. John, plus a reading of the first five verses of John 1,the opening words in St. John’s ground-breaking Prelude.  In Episode Twenty-seven I read and discuss the whole Prelude:  John 1:1-18.     Among the many examples of historic art depictions of St. John is a remarkable and colorful example from the Carolingian era of the revived Holy Roman Empire in western Europe.  The manuscript, The Benedictional of Aethelwold, a service book for the Mass by the Bishop of Winchester, based on the Gallican and Gregorian Sacramentaries, was protected by various noble families after the English Reformation.  It was acquired from the Duke of Devonshire, Chatsworth, Devonshire, by the British Library in 1958 A.D.  Below is the only illumination of a Gospel author that has survived, St. John with the traditional Eagle symbol.

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St. John Writing His Gospel.  Illumination in colored inks and gold on parchment, The Benedictional of Aethelwold, made at Winchester, England, for the use of Aethelwold, Bishop of Winchester, 963-984 A.D.   Ms. Additional 49598, Folio 19v, British Library, London, England.  Perspective correction applied.

Watch the Video of Episode Twenty-six.          Listen to the Podcast (Episode 26)

Watch the Video of Episode Twenty-seven.       Listen to the Podcast (Episode 27)

The text and audio of the next two episodes (28, 29) will be released during the week of Oct. 27th, with two more episodes each week until the entire revised series is complete later this year.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!   Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Please consider subscribing by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church legend in the righthand column.

New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 24 and 25

 

Luke-Writing His Gospel-Byzantine-Ms Additional 28815-f76v-BritLibr-PCA
St. Luke Writing His Gospel  Byzantine illumination in tempera and gold on parchment, 10th C. A.D., Constantinople.  From the Yorck Project (10000 Masterworks of Painting).  Original image is Ms. Additional 28815, Folio 76v, British Library, London, England.

Once again this week I have “doubled up” and uploaded two new episodes in the revised and extended version of our Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels.  In Episode Twenty-four and Episode Twenty-five I complete my discussion of the Gospel of St. Luke.  Both episodes are focused on Unique Content in the Gospel of St. Luke.  Episode Twenty-four is focused on the Kingdom Lectures and the Restoration of Zaccheus.  Episode Twenty-five is focused on three topics, Jesus Before Herod, the Prayer Habits of Jesus, and the important roles for women in St. Luke’s Gospel.   The featured image is a 10th C. A.D. Byzantine illumination in tempera and gold on parchment made at Constantinople, showing St. Luke seated in an upholstered chair with a platform for his feet and in front of a large desk writing his Gospel.  The desk is filled with quills and what looks like a paper knife.  There are scrolls and a inkpot at his feet.  This version does not include the traditional image of an ox, the symbol of Luke.  The original is from Ms. Additional 28815, Folio 76v, British Library, London, England.  The British Library has not yet digitized much of the Additional Ms collection, including No. 28815.  This version is sourced from the Yorck Project, a DVD published in 2002 A.D. as 10,000 Masterworks of Painting.  The entire set of more than 10,000 images can be viewed on line.

Watch the Video of Episode 24.        Listen to the Podcast of Episode 24.

Watch the Video of Episode 25.        Listen to the Podcast of Episode 25.

I have recorded the first two of twenty revised and extended versions focused on the Gospel of St. John, these being episodes twenty-six to forty-five.  Episode Twenty-six and Episode Twenty-seven will be released during the week of October 20th. Episode Twenty-five is focused on a general introduction to the Gospel of St. John and a reading of St. John’s unique Prelude in verses 1-5.  Episode Twenty-seven begins with a discussion of John 1:1-5 and moves on to reading and discussion of John 1:5-18.  Later today I will record the next two episodes which will be released during the week of October 27th.   The slides and script for all remaining episodes have been completed but lack sound tracks and picture-to-sound correlation in iMovie.  The final slide in the series, in Episode Forty-five, will be No. 1560 (vs. No. 885 in the original series).  It has been a great and enjoyable adventure finding and editing the great Christian tradition of spiritually-minded images (vs. the modern representational forms in which the meaning often gets lost in the details and backgrounds).  I hope and pray that viewers find them spiritually enriching and helpful in understanding Scripture.

I have started work on a new series of Podcast Homilies based upon the appointed readings from Psalms and Lessons for Morning Prayer in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer, using the alternative which includes a Gospel reading for the Second Lesson.  These will be linked from the Podcast Homilies page and posted in the order of the Church Calendar beginning with First Sunday in Advent.  I hope to have the four Advent podcasts complete before the start of the new Church Year 2019-2020 on December 1st.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God continue to bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

New Testament: Gospels – Episode Twenty-one

Harley 2799  f 173vI’m pleased to announce the uploading for another revised episode, Episode Twenty-one in the AIC Bible Study Video series, The New Testament: Gospels.  Content is Part 2 of 6 in Unique Content in the Gospel of St. Luke, including Sending the Return of the Seventy and Jesus’ encounter with Mary and Martha at Bethany.

This week’s featured illustration is a miniature illumination in gold and colored inks on parchment of St. Luke writing his Gospel from the Arnstein Bible, produced at Arnstein, Germany around 1172 A.D. from Ms. Harley 2799, Folio 173bv, British Library, London, England.  The image has to be shown quite small because the original image is also very small.  Any larger and the image would break up and the sheen on the gold would be reduced.  It was originally housed at the Monastery of St. Mary and St. Nicholas and was sold to Edward Harley in 1720/21.  The scribe’s name was Lunandus, a monk at the monastery.

Watch the video.        Listen to the Podcast version.

This uplink brings me very close to completing the rebuild of the episodes on St. Luke’s Gospel.  I have recorded and edited Episode Twenty-two and expect to upload it plus Episode Twenty-three during the week of October 7th, with the final two episodes coming the week of October 14th.  All the slides and text for all the episodes (26 to 45) on the Gospel of St. John are complete, but no episodes have yet been recorded.   These final episodes include many more examples of Church art that are rarely seen in public, including a Gospel book written in Germany between 778 and 820 A.D. at the start of the Carolingian era that began with the coronation at Rome of Charlemagne as Holy Roman Emperor in 800 A.D.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Please consider subscribing by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church legend in the righthand column.  You will receive a link to each new posting.

 

 

New Testament: Gospels-Episode Nineteen

After a short delay in production, Episode Nineteen in the revised editions of our Bible Study Video series, New Tesament: Gospels, is now online.  It runs just over 21 minutes, with a superb and very vivid early 11th C. illumination on the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus presented in 3 tiers.  The featured illustration, since I have used the Rich Man and Lazarus illumination in previous years, is a 16th C. restoration of much older fresco from Bulgaria.

Rich Man and Lazarus-Rila-PCA2
The Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus  Fresco, Monastery of St. Ivan of Rila, nr. Sofia,
Bulgaria.  Started 927 A.D.; Destroyed by Moslems, early 15th C.; Rebuilt late 15th C. 
Perspective correction and other adjustments applied.  Photo by Apostoloff  Creative Commons CC-by-SA 3.0.

Watch the video.         Listen to the Podcast.

I’ve been very busy completing the updating of the final episoses of the Gospel of  St. John.  Episode Forty-five should be complete by the end of the week or early next week.  It includes several illuminations I had not seen previously.

As always, thanks for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!   Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

New Testament Videos – Episode 18

Christ-in Majesty-Ms Royal 1 D X-Fol8v-BritLibr-PCA
Christ in Majesty.  Produced before 1220 A.D., Oxford, England.  Ms. Royal 1 D X, Folio 8v, British Library, London, England.  CCo license applies.

Episode Eighteen in the revised and expanded version of New Testament: Gospels is now available in video and podcast formats.  The episode is focused on the next three unique parable: the Lost Coin, the Lost Son (or Prodigal Son in the KJV) and the Unjust Steward.   This week’s favored graphic is a wonderful blue and red themed Christ in Majesty, which is the Western Church term for what the Eastern Church labels as Christ Pantokrator.  Christ is seated on a the throne of judgment within the traditional almond-shaped mandorla, which signifies the Glory of the Lord.  At each corner is a symbol of one of the Gospel authors.  It is an illumination in colored inks and gold on parchment from a Psalter made at Oxford in the 1st Qtr 13th C. A.D. but definitely before 1220 A.D.  I used perspective correction software on the original image.

Watch the Video.      Listen to the Podcast

I am currently completing the revisions to Episode Forty-two in the same series.   Episode Forty-two is focused on Unique Details – People, including Peter, Nicodemus, Judas Iscariot and Mary Madgalene.  The final slides as yet unedited are those about Mary Magdalene.  I have the text but haven’t decided upon the right illustrations.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Please consider becoming a follower by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church tab in the right column.

May the Lord bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Gospel of St. Luke – Episode 17

Christ-In Majesty-MS_Cotton_Galba_A_XVIII,_f._21r-Alt1-96dpi

Episode Seventeen in New Testament: Gospels is now available, a week later than expected owing to competing demands on my time.  The episode is focused on the first four of the Unique Parables in the Gospel of St, Luke, in order of appearance:  Good Samaritan, Rich Fool, Withered Fig Tree & Chief Seats.

This week’s featured illumination, used with the Parable of the Chief Seats, is Christ in Majesty, depicting Jesus seated on the throne of the New Jerusalem, surrounded by a chorus of virgins, martyrs and confessors, with the Greek symbols for Alpha and Omega and a Cross beside Him and a visible wound in His side.  It comes from the British Library’s Ms. Cotton Galba A XVIII, Folio 21v, in the Athelstan Psalter, made in or near Liege, Belgium, around 924 A.D. for the Bishop of Winchester and later given to the English king of Wessex, Athelstan.  The very large collection of manuscripts collected by Robert Cotton are only recently being digitized.

Watch the Video.    Listen to the Podcast.

I am currently working on the slides and text for Episode Forty-one, focused on Unique Details in the Gospel of St. John.  My timetable has been revised and I now hope to complete the remaining four episodes and add a new, final/summary episode before the end of the year.

As always, thanks for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!