Podcast Homilies Redux

I have now finished Phase I of the rebuilding of the Podcast Homilies page I announced in October.  Viewers and listeners will now find new links to freshly-recorded versions of my four theme-word or theme-phrase homilies for the Four Sundays in Advent; plus new Podcast Homilies for Christmas Day, First Sunday after Christmas Day, and Second Sunday after Christmas Day; and revised homilies for Epiphany (Day) and all six Sundays after Epiphany.  Within each homily are internal cross-references to Other AIC Resources on the same words, readings, topics or phrases.

These Other AIC Resources include:

  • Seasonal Videos:  our now-complete array of Seasonal Videos beginning with our two episode series, Advent: a Season of Penitence & Preparation, and ending with our nine episode series, Trinitytide: the Teaching Season.  Seasonal Videos are linked from the Digital Library page, displayed in order of the seasons on the Anglican Church Calendar.
  • Bible Study Videos:   both our Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels (presented in 44 episodes) and Revelation presented in 28 episodes.  New episodes in the New Testament series will be recorded during late Winter and Spring, 2019 A.D.  Bible Study videos are linked from the Bible Study page.
  • Christian Education Videos: These include The Nicene Creed (presented in eight episodes), The Lord’s Prayer (presented in two episodes), The Lives of the Saints (presented in two series); and the on-going series The War on Christianity.  Christian Education Videos are linked from the Digital Library page, following the Seasonal Video links.
  • AIC Bookstore Publications:  all our books are available by special order from commercial bookstores and through the Virtual Bookstore link on the Home Page, which connects viewers to my Amazon Author page.  There will likely be one new books added in 2019 A.D., a Nativity account using the complete text from the Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Luke, illustrated with many of the historic works of art which were used for the Seasonal Video series.

Phase 2 in the rebuild, to be completed in January A.D. 2019, will include revised Podcast Homilies, with internal cross-references, for Gesima (Pre-Lent); Lent; and Easter.   The texts for all three seasons have been written and need only a final review before recording.  Texts for Good Friday remain unchanged, since they were revised in Spring A.D. 2018.   Phase 3, to be completed in February A.D. 2019, will include Podcast Homilies for Whitsunday/Pentecost, Trinity Sunday and the Sundays after Trinity.   The texts for Trinity season are only in the early stage of editing.   Both Phase 2 and Phase 3 will be work to be accomplished in the cold, dark and wet days of Winter in Virginia, when working on the yard, garden and house cannot be comfortably accomplished.

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As always, thank you for your interest in and support of this unique Internet-based ministry.  May God continue to bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!   Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

The Podcast Homilies Rebuild

Just a little bit of introspection today.  I thought readers might want to know what’s in store for 2019 A.D. at the AIC web site.  With the coming completion of the Seasonal Video series (with Christmas: The Nativity of Our Lord‘s Episode Two in late October), attention turns to restructuring the Podcast Homilies platform, last changed early in 2015 A.D.

The Podcast Homilies page grew out of the 12-15 minutes homilies I delivered before my retirement from pulpit ministry.  The PH series is primarily focused on the Epistle and Gospel readings for the Sundays in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.   The restructuring will involved integrating the Podcast Homilies into the inventory of teaching material available through Other AIC Resources.    For each of the Podcast Homilies I will add mentions of where the verses cited in the script are used in the 1928 B.C.P. liturgies and also cross-referencing each homily to where the same words, phrases, concepts, subjects are treated in Other AIC materials.

When the project is complete, hopefully by late Winter 2018-2019 A,D., readers and listeners will be able to take full advantage of the greatly-enlarged library of materials available on or through the AIC Web Site.  For example: in a homily which includes a reading from the Gospel of St. Luke, there will be cross-references to where the same reading appears in our Bible Study video series New Testament: Gospels; the appropriate Seasonal Video series with episode number; appropriate Christian Education series (Nicene Creed; Lord’s Prayer; Lives of the Saints; The War on Christianity); appropriate AIC Bookstore Publications, especially Layman’s Lexicon.

As always, thank you for your interest and support for this online ministry.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

The Great “O” Antiphons for Advent – 2018 A.D. Edition

Royal 6 E.IX, f.4v
Christ in Glory, blessing the Blessed Virgin (on next page), mid-14th C, Pacino de Buonaguida, MSS Royal 6 E IX, Folio 4,  British Library, London, England. 

I’ve been busy updating The Great “O” Antiphons programs which were last updated in 2015 A.D., just after my retirement from pulpit ministry.  Since then I’ve learned a few new tricks and acquired many more images from the archives of the Western and Eastern Church traditions.  As viewers will have noticed, the style of AIC presentations has evolved since the launching of The Anglican Internet Church on the Web.  So far in 2018 A.D. I have updated our videos for Epiphany. Gesima (Pre-Lent) and Lent; expanded available offerings for Good Friday; and launched new series for the Easter, Trinity and Advent seasons.   I’ve completed the slides and script for a new 2-episode Christmas series, which will be available in October; and I am revising The Twelve Days of Christmas series, also with new slides and a revised style, with the revised version to be released in early November.

David-Ps4-UK-15thC
David on his harp, inside an illuminated capital letter, Psalter of Humphrey of Gloucester, London, 15th C., MSS Royal 2 B 1, Folio 8, British Library, London, England.

The Great “O” Antiphons program for the last seven days in Advent will remain a 7-episode series.  It will include new illustrations, including the 14th C. Christ image above and the David graphic at left.  I’ve made the style consistent with the format used for the new and revised programs mentioned above, which reflect capabilities of iMovie for the Mac (vs. the iPad version).

The 2018 A.D. edition will also include new Voice and Response contributions by the members of a local church.  These will be heard in the closing response to each of the seven Antiphons and in the closing Antiphons for Christmas Eve.

The introduction of all these remaining revised versions during the months of October and November will mark the completion of the AIC Seasonal Videos for each of the seasons on the Anglican Church Calendar.  There will now be teaching videos, written primarily for the Laity but also useful for Clergy, for every Sunday in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  I hope these will prove useful for understanding the meaning of, and appreciating the spiritual beauty of, traditional Anglican worship.

As always, thank you for your interest in and support for this Internet-based ministry.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Amen.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

Trinitytide-2018-Episode Nine

Feeding the 5000-loaves-fishes-Tissot-300dpi-Detail1
The Feeding of the 5,000 – a detail from a watercolor by James Tissot, painted between 1886 and 1894 A.D. as part of his Life of Christ series.  From the collection of the Brooklyn Museum.

The final episode in our Seasonal Video series, Trinitytide: The Teaching Season, is now available in video and podcast versions.  Episode Nine is focused on the Collect, Epistle and Gospel readings for Twenty-fourth Sunday after Trinity and Sunday Next before Advent, plus discussion of the 1928 Book of Common Prayer‘s complex rules for transferring surplus Sundays from Epiphany Season for years with 26 or 27 Sundays after Trinity.   I hope I have succeeded in explaining in layman’s terms the system which insures that Sunday Next before Advent, called Twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity until the 1892 Book of Common Prayer, will always end up as the final Sunday in Trinity season, no matter how many or how few Sundays there are “After Trinity.”

Watch the Video of Episode Nine       Listen to the Podcast of Episode Nine

Many changes have been made in the details of the format of the Seasonal Video series since I started them in 2011 A.D.  I’ve incorporated more historic art – our archive now includes about 800 images – and also added slides which explain “Other AIC Resources” containing information on the same topics and readings within a given episode.  I am pleased to let you know that the change has resulted in greater sales of AIC Bookstore Publications, including both paperback and Kindle editions.   100% of all book royalties are contributed to the AIC ministry on a monthly basis as they are received.   This income helps offset the cost of annual fees for our various web presences, including WordPress, where this Blog is hosted and which expects to be paid the next 12-month fee in August.

When I started doing the Seasonal Videos after my retirement from pulpit ministry, my intention was to offer programs on all the seasons in the Church Year.  The first series, focused on Epiphany, was incomplete.   It was edited and re-released in a full length version in time for Epiphany Season earlier in 2018 A.D.  I chose to focus on getting the AIC Bookstore Publications edited and ready for uploading instead of launching new programs.

Earlier in 2018 A.D. I produced series for the Gesima Sundays (pre-Lent) and the seasons of Lent and Easter and an updated version of In the Cross of Christ I Glory for Good Friday.  With the completion of the Trinitytide series, only Advent and Christmas remain without a teaching video/podcast series.    These last two series (Advent in two episodes; Christmas in one episode) are on schedule for release later in the year.  I anticipate releasing Advent: A Season of Penitence and Preparation in mid-September and early October.   I also plan to produce updated versions of the Great “O” Antiphons and The Twelve Days of Christmas series, with updated graphics.  Changes to the Great “O” Antiphons depend upon finding enough volunteers to speak the Voice and Response lines.

As always, I thank you for your interest in and support for this Internet-based ministry that is reaching people around the world daily.  Please consider becoming a follower by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church legend in the righthand column.  You’ll receive a request for your email address so that our site host (WordPress.com) can notify you of all new postings.  We do not share such information with any other organization.

May God bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Amen.

Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

 

Eastertide 2018 – Episode Two

Christ is Risen from the dead! Allelulia!

Christ-Emmaus-w2-Disciples-DuccioEpisode Two in the AIC Seasonal Video series, Eastertide: From Resurrection to Ascension, is now available in both video and podcast versions.  Subjects are services for Easter Monday and Easter Tuesday, each commemorating a post-Resurrection appearance of Christ, and the First, Second and Third Sundays after Easter.  There are 16 illustrations from the 11th, 12th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th C., including the tempera on panel work, Jesus on the Road to Emmaus, by Duccio di Buoninsegna in the Byzantine style at the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo (Siena), Siena, Italy, painted between 1308 and 1311 A.D. (Public domain: Yorck Project, 10,000 Masterwerke).

Watch the video.    Listen to the Podcast

Other artists whose work is represented in illustrations are Andrei Rublev (St. Paul; Jesus Christ); Altobello Melone (Road to Emmaus); Rembrandt (Supper at Emmaus); Raphael (Christ Resurrected); and Guadenzio Ferrari (the Resurrection scene, one of 21 images in Scenes in the Life of Christ).  Also included are a 10th C. mosaic and 14th C. bas relief of St. Peter; three stained glass windows from the 19th and 20th C. (Good Shepherd; St. Gregory the Great; Incredulity of St. Thomas); and a splendid 17th C. Russian Orthodox Resurrection icon with five scenes and a tooled silver cover.  For each of the three Sundays after Easter are related hymns from The St. Chrysostom Hymnal.

Episode Three in the series, to be available in mid-April, will include the Fourth and Fifth Sundays after Ascension, Ascension Day and Sunday after Ascension.

As always, thank you for your interest in and support for this Internet-based ministry.  You can help by sharing links to this site (and/or its topical pages), subscribing by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church tab in the right column, and by subscribing to the AIC’s YouTube channel (https://www.YouTube.com/c/saintjohnc) and its Podbean channel on which our over 600 podcasts are hosted (http://www.saintjohnc.podbean.com).

Be unrestrained in celebrating Christ’s Resurrection today, the Day That Changed the World, at a church of your choice.  Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

Eastertide-2018-Episode One

Easter-MiniThis morning I uploaded Episode One in our newest Seasonal Video series, Eastertide: From Resurrection to Ascension.  The episode includes 17 illustrations from the 13th to the 19th C. (with a photograph from the 21st C.), mostly Resurrection imagery.  Artists include, in order of use, fresco-makers at Constantinople, James Tissot, William Holman Hunt, Giotto, fresco-makers at Milan, Byzantine icon-painters, and Russian Orthodox icon painters, including the celebrated Andrei Rublev, from the 15th to the 18th C.   Regular viewers will have noticed the change in the series graphic from Portrait to Landscape orientation.  This became necessary when I switched production of videos from the version of iMovie on my iPad to the enhanced version on my Mac.  The “Ken Burns effect” program on the Mac, which has many additional features, especially in the area of multi-source soundtracks, is strongly biased toward Landscape imagery.   Viewers will easily see the difference in the way the images scan during the video.  For those especially fond of icons:  the image in the title graphic is one of the best, most carefully drawn representations of the classic “Harrowing of Hades” depiction of Christ, standing on the destroyed gates of Hades and the pit with the “keys to Hades and Death,” lifting Adam (in white) and Eve (in red) from Hades.  The figure with halo at left center (near the tip of Jesus’ right hand) is John the Baptist, observing in his status as the Last Prophet of the Old Testament.  The blue oval is a classic representation of the Glory of the Lord, sheckinah in Hebrew.

Watch the Video.     Listen to the Podcast version

The program, which runs just over 29 minutes, begins with a discussion of the history of the Feast of Feasts from its origins in the early Church both Eastern and Western to 20th C. liturgies in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  The program continues with a discussion of the meaning of Easter and its central place in Christian theology, followed by prayer books services for Easter Day, including the changes to Morning Prayer and the two sets of Collect, Epistle and Gospel readings for the day.  Also included is information about seasonal music for Easter from The St. Chrysostom Hymnal and cross-reference to other AIC programs and publications appropriate for Easter Day observances.

Episode Two, focused on Easter Monday and Tuesday and the First, Second and Third Sundays after Easter is almost complete and should be available in video and podcast versions on or before April 2nd.

I’ve posted new links on the Welcome page to Part I and Part II of the Good Friday program as well as the new Eastertide episode for Easter Day.  You can similate the experience of a Good Friday 12 Noon service by opening Part I of In the Cross of Christ I Glory and pausing at the appropriate times between Noon and 3 PM (which obviously requires also opening Part 2 after the completion of the prayers for the Fourth Word.  Part Two resumes the program with Fifth Word for 1:55 P.M.  Again I think the parishioners of Holy Cross REC for providing the voices for the “all saying together” sections and the responses, including the Amens.

I am exploring the movement of all our videos from YouTube to Vimeo, owing to Google’s increasing anti-religious bias.  I also intend to drop my Twitter channel, for the same reason.  Unfortunately, Facebook is important as a vehicle for reaching a broad audience around the world.  I will continue to post church-related links on both my personal and AIC pages at Facebook.   I do not make any personal information posts on my Facebook page and do not use its Messenger program.

As always, thank you for your interest in and support for the AIC’s online ministry.  Your consideration in sharing links and messages with friends, family, business associates and others does help the AIC reach more people, especially those who do not have a local source for traditional Christian teaching and liturgy.

Glory be to God for all things!

In the Cross of Christ I Glory for Good Friday, A.D. 2018

In the Cross
I’m very pleased to announce the uploading yesterday of the AIC Seasonal Video series, In the Cross of Christ I Glory just in time for Good Friday in A.D. 2018.   The program is a video version of the Noon to 3 P.M. Good Friday program I presented at my former parish before my retirement from the pulpit ministry.  Although the actual program was spread across a three-hour timespan, the actual spoken content ran to less than one hour.  To keep the video version within reasonable time limits, the 2018 A.D, video version is presented in two parts.   Part One (32 min) includes the Opening Prayers, Introduction, and the First through the Fourth words.  Part Two (26 min) includes the Fifth, Sixth and Seventh words plus the Closing Remarks.

Watch Part 1.   Listen to the Podcast of Part 1.

Watch Part 2.   Listen to the Podcast of Part 2.

In the Cross-Slide12-revIn the earlier podcast versions I read both the Verse and the Response lines and said the Amen.  In the new video version, I enlisted the help of the congregation at Holy Cross Reformed Episcopal Church in North Chesterfield, VA.  I thank them for their enthusiastic participation.   They and I speak the opening Confession (left), repeated at the start of each section); the opening Verse and Response that includes the Lord’s Prayer; the  internal transition Verse and Response (see below) in each of the seven parts; the closing Verse and Response which includes the Nicene Creed; and, throughout, the Amen for each prayer.    To enhance the viewing experience and make it as much as possible like participation in the original 3-hour program, I have inserted an Intermission slide betweenIn the Cross-Title-Intermission each of the sections, with the instruction to pause the video. Each transition slides notes the starting time of the next section.

The program is built upon the solid foundation laid in 1946 A.D. by the Most Rev. William Moody, Bishop of Lexington, KY, who built his work upon the early-20th C. Good Friday lessons by the eminent theologian, the Very Rev. George Moody, who headed the Episcopal Theological Seminary, Cambridge, MA.  To this wonderful base of spiritual-minded prayers (about half of which were composed by Bp. Moody) and reflections upon the lessons of Good Friday, I added, in the mini-homilies in each section, the interpretations of the great Eastern Church fathers, including St. John Chrysostom (John the Golden Mouth); St. Gregory of Nyssa; and St. Athanasius of Alexandria.

In the Cross-Slide23The video version includes 117 slides, each with an illustration.  There are about 48 different illustrations, ranging from the oldest known representation of the Crucifixion from around the mid-6th C. in Northern Mesopotamia (part of modern Syria), to mosaics, frescoes, watercolors, engravings, and paintings from the 6th through the 18th C. in the Western and Eastern Church artistic traditions; and, from the 19th C., stained glass windows.  One of these windows, a stunningly-beautiful piece at St. Gertrude’s Church, Stockholm, Sweden, is used as the transition slide that marks the start of the Verse and Response for each part of the program.  For the Confession slide, I inserted a Christ Pantokrator mosaic (top left) from the Hagia Sophia at Constantinople commissioned by the Byzantine Emperor Justininian in the 6th C.  The picture credit lines are not mentioned in the narrative, both to save time and to avoid distraction from the meaning of the text and the solemn mood of the presentation.

I hope you will share links to this presentation with friends, family, business associates, and others with an interest in hearing traditional Christian teaching and interpretation.

As always, I thank you for your interest in and support for this Internet-based ministry.  May the Lord bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Amen.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Episode Seven – The War on Christianity

WOC-Slide96aWith Episode Seven in The War on Christianity I conclude my discussion of the Te Deum Laudamus in its function as a First Line of Defense for any Christian in the world’s on-going battle with Christianity.  The focus of the discussion is Part Two (“Thou art the King of Glory: though “numbered with thy saints in glory everlasting”) and Part Three (“O Lord save thy people” through “let me never be confounded”).  I close the episode with an exploration of the Scriptural origin and usage of “confounded,” especially in the sense of its meaning as not letting oneself get led away from Christian Truth.

Watch Episode Seven.     Listen to Episode Seven.

Readers of the blog should be pleased to learn that I’ve completed all but the recording of Episode Three, the final episode, in Lent A.D. 2018, which is focused on Passion Sunday, Palm Sunday and Holy Week (including Easter Eve).  I hope to get the recording finished next week and, barring any technical glitches, get it uploaded by the end of the week or the first of the following week.

In the Cross-Slide1In other news, I’ve decided to produce a video version of In the Cross of Christ I Glory, the three-hour Good Friday meditations I developed and used in my former parish.  The videos will be produced in however many parts are required to keep each episode to under 35 minutes.  There will be Intermission slides between each of the segments so that viewers can pause the video until the appropriate hour.  There will be no separate podcast versions, since Podcasts of an earlier version are already available from the Podcast Homilies page:

  • Opening Sentences, Prayers and Responses (12:00 Noon)
  • Introduction (12:10 P.M.)
  • First Word (12:30 P.M.)
  • Second Word (12:50 P.M.)
  • Third Word (1:10 P.M.)
  • Fourth Word (1:35 P.M.)
  • Fifth Word (1:55 P.M.)
  • Sixth Word (2:15 P.M.)
  • Seventh Word (2:35 P.M.)
  • Closing Prayers (2:50 P.M.)

The videos will include many illustrations of the events of Good Friday and images associated with the source of the prayers, including stained glass windows, icons, frescoes, mosaics, and engravings from the 6th through the late 19th C.   In this way I can share with viewers much of the catalogue of public domain and royalty-free images I have assembled since launching the AIC effort in 2010 A.D.

As always, thank you for your interest in and support of the Internet-based ministry of The Anglican Internet Church.  Please consider sharing content with friends, family and others and also subscribing to the blog by click the “Follow Anglican Internet Church” tab in the right hand column.

Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

 

Epiphany: the Manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles – Episode Three

Epiphany-2018-Slide43Episode Three, the final episode, in the AIC Seasonal Video series, Epiphany: the Manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles, is now available in both video and podcast versions.   Episode Three is exclusively focused on the Second Sunday after Trinity through the Sixth Sunday after Trinity, including the complicated rules for their celebration in years with both 26 and 27 Sundays after Trinity.   For each Sunday there is a discussion of the theme of the day, the Epistle and Gospel readings, and appropriate music for the day or season.  Includes music added for the St. Chrysostom Hymnal, complete in one volume, released earlier this year.

Watch the Video.    Listen to the Podcast version.

I have started work on the “Gesima” season version which follows the same format.  I hope to have Episode One completed before Septuagesima Sunday on February 28th.

As always, thank you for your support of and interest in the Internet-based ministry of the Anglican Internet Church.  May the Lord bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!