New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 40 to 43

Christ-Last Supper-Codex_Bruchsal_1_28r
The Last Supper  Codex Bruchsal, circa 1220 A.D., also called the Evangelistar von Speyer, after the Cathedral for which it was made.  The top panel shows St. John leaning upon Jesus’ breast and the disloyal Judas separated from the others in the lower left side.   The bottom panel has two scenes of Jesus washing the feet of the Disciples, with St. Peter in the right hand panel, his hand to his head in the manner described by St. John (“It is he to whom I shall give a piece of bread when I have dipped it” John 13:26a).  The image is also published in Wikipedia Commons under the CCo (non-commerical) license.

Contininuing toward final completion of the upgrading of the New Testament: Gospels Bible Study Video series, this week I offer you information about four more episodes, which are the 2nd through 5th in a series of 7 on Unique Themes, Details and Events.  Episode Forty continues my discussion of Unique Themes, with more on Light vs. Darkness; Good vs. Evil; Truth vs. Falsehood; the Emotions of Jesus, shown in four examples; Numerology; St. Jobn’s frequest use of “the Jews”; and Jesus’ prophecies.  In Episode Forty-one the focus shifts to unique mentions of Places and People: Cana, Samaria, the Samaritan Woman at the Well, Thomas, Nathanael, Philip & Andrew,and  the Father-Son relationship.  In Episode Forty-two  the focus is on unique references to Peter, Nicodemus, Judas Iscariot, and Mary Magdalene.  Finally, in Episode Forty-three, the unique subjects are the Sanhedrin Plot, the New Commandment, the lack of an “agony in the garden” scene, Jesus’ use of “lift up” or “lifted up” in reference to the Son of Man, and, finally, Jesus’ use of concepts of time, beginning with “hour”, from the Greek hora.  The discussion continues into the next episode.

This week the competition of featured illustration was again close, between the Arrest of Jesus from the Codex Egberti, a mosaic of St. Peter at St. Michael’s Golden-domed Monastery at Kiev, and the Last Supper from the Codex Bruchsal, made in Cologne region of Germany around 1220 A.D.  The latter was the winner, owing to its spectacular use of color and complexity of detail based on  Chapter 13 in the Gospel of St. John.

Watch: Episode Forty.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty.

Watch: Episode Forty-one.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty-one.

Watch: Episode Forty-two.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty-two.

Watch: Episode Forty-three.      Listen: Podcast-Episode Forty-three.

The final two episodes, Forty-four and Forty-five, are complete and will be the subject of the blog entry for the week of Nov. 24th.

The graphics on most of the pages on this site have been upgraded and, hopefully, the persistent glitches of unwanted blank lines removed.   These do not seem to want to go away no matter how many times the files are corrected.

I am working on another project but am not yet ready to declare whether it will be completed.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 36 to 39 – the Seven Signs

Christ-Raising of Lazarus-Church in Mistra_001
The Raising of Lazarus, fresco, 15th C. A.D., Pantanassa Church, Mistra, Greece, from the Yorck Project:  10,000 Masterworks.

Moving along rapidly toward completing the updating of our Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels, this week I bring you four more episodes, all focused on the Seven Signs in the Gospel of St. John plus additional unique material.  St. John makes an interesting distinction, referring to these seven events, five of which are unique to the Gospel of John, as “signs” from the Greek semeion.  I explain the theories of why in the video series.  Episode Thirty-six is focused exclusively on the Wedding at Cana, “This beginning of signs Jesus did in Cana of Galilee, and manifested His glory, and His disciples believed in Him” (John 2:11).   Episode Thirty-seven includes the Healing of the Nobleman’s Son (John 4:46-54); the Healing of the Paralytic Man (John 5:1-1-15); and Pt 1 of 2 on the Healing of the Man Born Blind (John 9:1-41).  Episode Thirty-eight completes my discussion of the five unique signs with the Healing of the Man Born Blind (Pt 2 of 2) and the Raising of Lazarus (John 11:38-43).  Episode Thirty-nine includes discussion of the two signs which are also reported with slightly different details in one or more of the Synoptic Gospels: the Feeding of the 5,000 (John 6:1-14) and the Walking on Water (John 6:15-21), followed by the Part 1 of 7 on Unique Themes, Details and Events in the Gospel of John, starting with the spiritual themes of Light vs. Darkness, Good vs. Evil; Truth vs. Falsehood; Life vs. Death; Heaven vs. Earth; moving on to the first of Unique Details: the Emotions of Jesus; Numerology in the Gospel of John; John’s extensive use of “Jews”; and Prophecy.

Once again, the choice of the featured image was difficult, since there are a great many amazing images in these four episodes.   The contest ended in a draw.   The first, above, used in Episode Thirty-eight, is a 15th C. fresco, the Raising of Lazarus, Pantanassa Church, Mistra, Greece, from the DVD collection known as the Yorck Project more commonly called 10,000 Masterworks.  The photograph was taken more than 15 years ago and one hopes that restoration, or at least, active preservation techniques, have halted the deterioration of this remarkable image.   It’s rival in the Western Church tradition is Duccio di Buoninsegna’s egg tempera and gold on panel work, produced between 1310 and 1311 A.D. at Siena, Italy, from the Kimball Art Museum, Ft. Worth, TX.

Christ-Raising_of_Lazarus-Duccio_di_Buoninsegna,_1310–11)
The Raising of Lazarus, egg tempera and gilt on panel, Duccio di Buoninsegna, 1310-1311 A.D., Kimball Art Museum, Ft. Worth, TX.

Watch: Episode Thirty-six.    Listen: Podcast-Episode Thirty-six.

Watch: Episode Thirty-seven.   Listen: Podcast-Episode Thirty-seven.

Watch: Episode Thirty-eight.    Listen:Podcast-Episode Thirty-eight.

Watch:  Episode Thirty-nine.    Listen: Podcast-Episode Thirty-nine.

In the week of Nov. 17th my focus will be on Episode Forty to Episode Forty-three, which include Parts 2 through 5 of seven on Unique Themes, Details and Events in the Gospel of St. John.

During the week of Nov. 24th my focus will be on the final two episodes, Episode Forty-four and Episode Forty-five, the last of which is focused on five unique events in the Gospel of St. John plus a summary of the entire series.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

New Testament: Gospels – Episodes 32 to 35

 

Christ-Good Shepherd-Ravenna-5thC
I Am the Good Shepherd, Byzantine mosaic, 1st half, 5th C. A.D., Mausoleum of Galla Placida, Ravenna, Italy.  The Yorck Project: 10,000 Masterworks.

Keeping with the pace started last week, I’ve uploaded four more episodes in the New Testament: Gospels series.  This week’s uploads are Episode Thirty-two, Episode Thirty-three, Episode Thirty-four and Episode Thirty-five.  In these four episodes I complete my discussion and commentary on the “I Am” declarations in the Gospel of St. John, including the Bread of Life; The Living Bread; The Light of the World; I Am From above; I Am not of this world; Before Abraham Was, I Am; I Am the Door; I Am the Good Shepherd; I Am the Resurrection and the Life; I Am the Way, the Truth, and the Life; and, finally, I am the True Vine.

As always, selection of a featured illustration is difficult, with so many choices across four episodes.  This time I selected another example of early Byzantine art in the west at Ravenna, Italy.  The photograph was used in the Yorck Project’s DVD: 10,000 Masterworks.   The DVD is accessible online, but be prepared: there are actually more than 10,000 images, which are arranged alphabetically, some by title and some by artist.

Watch Episode Thirty-two.           Podcast version of Episode Thirty-two

Watch Episode Thirty-three.      Podcast version of Episode Thirty-three.

Watch Episode Thirty-four.       Podcast version of Episode Thirty-four.

Watch Episode Thirty-five.        Podcast version of Episode Thirty-five.

The next group of four episodes, 36 to 39, are about the Seven Signs in the Gospel of St. John, treating those six which are unique to St. John’s Gospel first, followed by the last two, which appear in the Synoptic Gospels.   These are complete and will be featured here during the week of Nov. 10th, when the featured illustration is a 15th C. fresco of the Raising of Lazarus from a church in Greece.

The next group, also of four, 40 to 43, is focused on Unique Themes, Details & Events in the Gospel of St. John, beginning with Themes; followed by Details of Content; followed by unique mentions of Places and People, including Cana and Samaria; Peter; Nathanael; Philip; Andrew; the Samaritan Woman (Photina).   These four are complete and will be featured here during the week of Nov. 17th, when the featured illustration is a mid-19th Eastern Orthodox Christ Pantokrator image in Romania.

The final two episodes are complete in script and slides but still need a voice track.  The voice track will be recorded during the week of Nov. 10th with release during the week of Nov. 24th.  They are focused on more unique details & one five unique events in the Gospel of St. John, including the Visit of Nicodemus; the Restoration of the Adulterous Woman; Foot Washing on Maundy Thursday; the institution of the Sacrament of Penance/Confession; and Jesus’ Breakfast the the Seashore with the eleven remaining Disciples; and, ending with some summary slides on all four Gospels and the series.  The featured illustration will be a splendid mosaic of Jesus washing St. Peter’s feet from the tradtion of the Eastern Church.

In other news, I have upgraded the illustrations throughout the AIC Web Site and fixed (I hope) some glitches in spacing that in previous attempts don’t want to stay fixed.  I’ll be very surprised is they stay fixed.  I think I need some help from the technical people at WordPress.com.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen! Glory be to God for all things! Amen!