Revised Podcast Homilies for Trinity Season Now Complete

All the Podcast Homilies for Trinity Season, including Sunday next before Advent. are now available in their revised versions.  Each includes cross-reference to Other AIC Resources, including videos, podcastsand books, on the same words, topics and phrases.  All links to previous versions of the Podcast Homilies have been deleted.

Now that this year-long task is completed, I plan to return to work on the Bible Study video series, New Testament: Gospels.  Episodes on the Gospel of St. Matthew were uploaded earlier this year.  With luck, next week I will begin uploading the episodes on the Gospel of St. Mark.  Some are already available for uploading.  Others need editing of the voice track.  I am currently working on the script and slides for the final episode focused on the Gospel of St. Luke.  All links to previous versions are no longer available.  As of Episode Twenty-four, the number of slides in the series is more than double that of the previous version.  The additional slides include more actual Scriptural quotations and many more illustrations from the artistic tradition of the Church.  These revised versions will give viewers a glimpse of the latest historic art now available in the public domain.  Many of these from the 10th through the 16th C. have never been available to the non-scholar general public.  Many libraries are now very busy digitizing their collections.  I will be watching for additional material as it becomes available.  These great works of religious art have been added to our Internet presence as an aid to greater spiritual understanding of the content of Scripture.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Please consider recommending this site to friends and family.  You can received the latest information by clicking on the Follow Anglican Internet Church tab in the right column of this page.  Wordpress will send notice of all new postings.

Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Four More Podcast Homilies for Trinity

I’ve uploaded four more revised Podcast Homilies, these for the Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Sundays after Trinity.  Next week (week of 5/13) I plan to record and upload the next four and, later in May and early June, complete the plan for issuing revised Podcast Homilies for the remaining Sundays in Trinity Season, through Sunday next before Advent.   As noted earlier, each of these revised versions includes cross-references to Other AIC Resources on the topics discussed, including Bible Study, Seasonal, and Christian Education videos and AIC Bookstore Publications.

Currently in progress is revisions to the Bible Study series, New Testament: Gospels.  All the episodes on the Gospel of St. Mark are now complete and ready to record and publish.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Glory be to God for all thing! Amen.

Podcast Homilies for Easter to Ascension

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Christ Resurrected (Gr: Anastasis) – Greek Orthodox narthex mosaic in the Byzantine style, 11th C.  Public Domain.   Jesus stands upon the destroyed gates of Hades, lifting Adam and Eve from the pit.

The revised edition of all seven Podcast Homilies for the period from Easter (Day) through Sunday after Ascension are now available, using links on the Podcast Homilies page.  The upload completes the updating of Podcast Homilies for all the Sundays from First Sunday in Advent through Sunday after Ascension.  The Podcast Homilies for Good Friday were updated in A.D. 2018.

In the revised versions, all the Podcast Homilies included cross reference to “Other AIC Resources” on topics covered in each homily.

The remaining Podcast Homilies for the balance of the Church Calendar (Whitsunday, Trinity Sunday and all the Sundays after Trinity, and Sunday next Before Advent) are currently in production, with recording and uploading anticipated before Whitsunday A,D. 2019.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

New Testament: Gospels – Episode Six

Peter-Fish-coin-AugustinTunger-1486-PCA
St. Peter Paying the Temple Tax, illumination in colored inks on paper, Augustin Tumbler, Facetias Latinae et Germanicae (literally, Amusing Things), Konstanz, Germany, 1486 A.D. Codex HB V 24a. Public Domain (Wikipedia Commons).  Perspective correction applied.

Episode Six, the final episode focused on the Gospel of St. Matthew, in the AIC Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels, is now online in video and podcast versions.  This completes the rebuild of the St. Matthew portion of the Bible Study Videos, making them consistent with current videos in all series and also adding many examples of historic Church art from many sources.  Episode Six includes selected examples of unique content and quotations, including the long form of the Lord’s Prayer and the Beatitudes, plus the “kingdom” parables, and, as shown in the illustration, the curious miracle of the coin in the fish at Capernaum (Matt. 17:24-29).

Watch the Video       Listen to the Podcast

In the next episode, Episode Seven, I focus on the Gospel of St. Mark with an introduction to its history, authorship, time frame, language, intended audience and style, plus the beginning of my discussion of St. Mark’s themes, starting the Jesus as Servant of the Father.

As always, thank you for your interest and support, which enables the production of these videos free-of-charge, on-demand, through links from this Web Site.

May God bless you in all that you do in his name! Amen.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen.

 

New Testament: Gospels – Episode Three

Episode Three in the revised edition of The New Testament: Gospels was uploaded to YouTube earlier this afternoon.  The focus this time is completion of discussion of St. Matthew’s genealogy of Jesus, including the four women named, and the start of discussion of his theme of the Life of Christ as fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy.

Matthew-Writing-LindisfarnePCAThis week’s rarely seen illustration is the illumination of Matthew Writing His Gospel from the Lindisfarne Gospels, produced in England around 750 A.D., with perspective correction adjustments, from the British Library by way of the Yorck Project: 10,000 Masterworks.

Watch the Video

Listen to the Podcast

Next week’s release of Episode Four features more on the fulfillment of prophecy theme.

As always, thanks for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

 

New Testament: Gospels – Episode Two

Matthew-Writing-Codex Aureus-Stockholm-c750-Detail1-PCAEpisode Two in the revised edition of the AIC Bible Study Video series, The New Testament:Gospels, is now available in both video and podcast formats.  The episode, an introduction to the Gospel of St. Matthew beginning with its history and the genealogy of Jesus, includes four images of St. Matthew not often seen by the general public. The best of these, at left, is an illumination of St. Matthew from the Codex Aureus of Canterbury, made around 750 A.D. in England in the region of Canterbury.   The Codex Aureus (Golden Gospel) was stolen by Viking raiders in the 9th C. and bought back through a monetary ransom payment later the same century.  Where it resided between then and its movement to Spain in the early 16th C. is unclear.  Two centuries later, in 1690 A.D. it was bought by the King of Sweden and since then has resided at the Konigliga Bibliotek (Royal Library), Stockholm, Sweden. The Codex is also known as the Codex Aureus of Stockholm.  The image is from the Yorck Project’s CD collection, 10,000 Masterworks through Wikipedia Commons.  I adjusted the image using perspective and other correction methods in Photoshop.

The second ancient image is equally magnificent, a page from a Gospel book produced by the Ottonian dynasty of Holy Roman Emperors in the late 9th or early 10th C. from Cotton Ms Tiberius A II, in the collection of the British Library, London, England.   The third, circa 950 A.D., also comes the Ottonian period, from the collection of the New York Public Library.    The fourth is closely-related to the start of the reign of Charlesmagne, the first emperor of the revived Holy Roman Empire in Europe, crowned by the sitting Pope in 800 A.D.  The source is the Harley Golden Gospel, made in Aachen, Germany, around 800 A.D. from Ms. Harley 2788, also in the British Library, London.  Most of us in the Western Church do not give enough credit to Charlesmagne’s commitment to the spread of Christianity into the Germanic territories.  His sponsorship resulted in the creation of some of the finest religious art in the Western Church.

Watch Episode Two.    Listen to Episode Two.

Episode Three, focused on more of the genealogy of Jesus and St. Matthew’s theme of the life of Jesus as fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy,  will be released next week.  The episode features more remarkable images of St. Matthew and other religious art.

As always, may God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

The New Testament: Gospels – Episode One

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After repeated delays for technical reasons, Episode One in the revised AIC Bible Study Video series, The New Testament: Gospels, is now available in both video and podcast version.   The new version is the third to be produced.  The first was a series of live videocasts from my former parish.  The second edition was introduced in A.D. 2015 after my retirement from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014.

Version Three includes many improvements, including a revised format more consistent with the style of the more recent AIC videos; many more examples of historic art from the 6th through the 20th C. from archives which have been digitized for wider audiences; and more direct quotations of Scripture, especially in the episodes on the Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Mark, which were the earliest in the series presented in a different format than later episodes.   The series retains the original focus on teaching for the Laity and the informal style of presentation.

Watch the Video of Episode One                   Listen to the Podcast of Episode One

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Luke Writing from Ms Harley 5785, Folio 187v, perspective correction applied, British Library, London, England.

Among the examples of historic art included in Episode One is Luke Writing His Gospel, an illumination in tempera and gold on parchment produced in the region of Constantinople in the late 11th to early 12th C.  I applied perspective correction to the original image from Ms Harley 5785, Folio 187v, British Library, London, England.   Our archive now includes nearly a thousand such images from libraries, museums, churches, and government archives in England, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Russia, Macedonia, Bulgaria and the United States.   These historic images are both beautiful and instructive on the spiritual message in the scenes depicted.  I have included works in nearly every artistic medium, including icons, frescos, mosaics, oil paintings, watercolors, etchings and engravings.  All examples which have been modified for correction of perspective and other flaws with the objective of presenting a finished work more like its original shape are so identified in the credit lines.  Examples from many libraries and other sources can only be used for non-commerical purposes.  I have removed the links to all video and podcast versions of the earlier series.

The text and slides for Episode Two through Episode Sixteen, the latter including material from the opening chapters of the Gospel of St. Luke, have been completed.  Each needs to be converted into video form, which is a multi-step and time-consuming process, but I hope to release one episode per week throughout 2019 A.D. until all 45 episodes in the series are complete.   Things that can upset the schedule include the temptation to go back into finished work to add historic art more recently discovered.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Podcast Homilies for Lent

All seven episodes in my revised and, hopefully, improved Podcast Homilies for Lent are now online.  Previously, there was no Podcast Homily just for Ash Wednesday.   In this version Ash Wednesday, St. Gregory the Great’s gift to the world in 601 A.D., has its own Podcast Homily.  This leaves the Podcast Homilies for Easter, Ascension, Pentecost/Whitsunday, and Trinity remaining to be recorded later in the Spring.  You can listen to any episode using the links on the Podcast Homilies page.

In my remarks for Palm Sunday I offer a combined reading based upon all the Gospel accounts of Palm Sunday.  Among the images I used in the companion Seasonal Video video series for Lent, Episode Three, I used the image below.

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Entry into Jerusalem, Romanesque apse fresco, Medieval period, unspecified Lutheran Church, Jutland region, Denmark.   Image copyright Stig Alena|Dreamstime.com

Meanwhile, I continue making excellent progress on the revised versions of our Bible Study Video series, The New Testament: Gospels.  Scripts are written and slides prepared for the first eleven episodes, taking the series through the Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Mark.  I recorded and edited Episode One earlier this week and hope to have it available online next week.  Episode One is focused on the New Testament’s history and a lot of background information about how it was developed, when and by whom.  I hope viewers will be pleased with the illustrations I chose for the episode, including an illuminated cover from the Book of Kells, circa 800 A.D., and a text page with the words from  John 1:1  painted in the last Qtr of the 9th C-1st Qtr of the 10th C. and used in English Coronations for generations afteward.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Please consider becoming a follower by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church tab in the right side column.   Please rest assured that we do not share email addresses with any other entity.

Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

Podcast Homilies for “Gesima” Season

 

Laborers in the Vineyard.jpg
Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard, Matthew 20:1-16, miniature in tempera and gold on parchment, Codex Aureus of Echternach, 1030-1050 A.D., Made at the Abbey of Echternach, Echternach, Luxembourg (then Germany), German National Museum, Nuremberg, Germany.  The scenes is one three on a single sheet of miniature illuminations.

The revised and expanded Podcast Homiles series now includes three Homilies for Septuagesima, Sexagesima and Quinquagesima Sundays.  In the style of the revised material being produced for the 2018-2019 Church Year, the homilies include cross-reference to Other AIC Resouces linked from this Web Site.

Septuagesima Sunday:
1st Corinthians 9:24-27/Matthew 20:1-16
Sexagesima Sunday:
2nd Corinthians 11:19-31/Luke 8:4-15
Quinquagesima Sunday:
1st Corinthians 1:1-13/Luke 18:31-43

Podcast Homilies for Ash Wednesday, the Sundays in Lent, Easter, the Sundays after Easter; Ascension; Sunday after Ascension; Whitsunday; Trinity Sunday, the Sundays after Trinity will be recorded and uploaded in the coming weeks, hopefully before Easter Day.

Meanwhile, I continue to work on the revised versions of all 45 episodes in our Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels.  Slides and Script for Episode One through Episode Seven, focused on the Gospel of St. Matthew, are complete, but the voice track has yet to be recorded.  There are about twice as many slides in the new version and all episodes include many of the examples of historic art which have been used in our video series, plus a great many more which were made into the correct format late last year.  There will be illustration which viewers most likely have never seen, especially in a higher resolution format.

As always, thanks for your interest in and support for this online ministry.  Please consider become a follower by clicking “Follow Anglican Internet Church” legend in the far right column.  Once you’ve shared your email address, you will automatically receive notice of all new postings.  Your information is never shared with any other organization and you can remove your name at any time.

Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!