Epiphany Greeting

This year I’m forgoing my usual message about the true meaning of Epiphany – vs. the secular view even among many clergy who should know better.  If you want to hear that message, Go to Episode One in our Seasonal Video series, Epiphany: the Manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles.  Or listen to the Podcast version of the same.

Instead I offer some New Year advice for those concerned about the state of the media, the lack of civility, and the general decline of standards everywhere.  Dealing with it can be stressful, but there is a way to reduce the stress and allow anyone to improve their focus on truly important things.  My advice is summed up in a slogan:

Turn It Off.  Tune It Out!

Instead of allowing the media to set your agenda and affect your blood pressure, just turn it off and tune it out.

  • Turn off the TV and leave it off (except for weather and other emergencies).   We dropped cable and satellite TV over a year ago.
  • Use one of the many music programming services to select what you want to hear.  For example, you can download from Amazon Music and create your own play list that travels with you wherever you have an internet connection.  My wife has made up play lists for various categories and we listen only to them on the car stereo through her iPhone/Amazon Music app.  These categories include Really Old (1940s-1950s Big Band); Seventies; Eighties; Carolinas (for trips to both of them); County and Western (G. Strait, Meryl Haggard, Texas Swing, etc.); Classical; Brokenwood County (for the great music inspired by the New Zealand video series, Brokenwood Mysteries.  The music is often an NZ variant on Patsy Cline.
  • Make up your own Favorites list for iPad, iMac, iPhone or Android devices.  My categories – which I read first thing every morning – are 1) News (Washington Times/Bongino Report/CNS News Service/Local TV for weather & business news).  2) Opinion (The Federalist/American Thinker/NY Sun/American Spectator/Issues & Insights (a new site from the former editors of Investors Business Daily)/Red State/American Greatness/Steyn Online (Corkie and I are charter members of his Mark Steyn Club)/PJ Media/VDH online/Powerline.    These give me access to reliable sources and nearly all have links to the stories on which their links are based.  All without subscriptions, fees and endless and mindless babble that fills up the space between the endless and mindless advertising.
  • Set up your own home movie theater.  All you need is a laptop, an LCD projector and a screen.  We watch a video nightly from our collection of classic movies and programming (Midsomer/Lovejoy/Doc Marin/Inspector Frost/Under the Hammer/Morse and its prequel, Endeavour/Longmire/ and many others including the original Hawai’i 5-0 in its first six or seven season).

Give the idea a try for a few months.  I’ll bet you will have more peace of mind, which will enable you to have more time for family and friends and to practice your religion as you see fit!

Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Celebrate Advent the Anglican Way

 

Advent-2018-Mini-TitleAt the AIC we teach the concept of celebrating the Church Calendar.  Each season has its own focus and now that Advent is here, Anglicans should celebrate their heritage.  Here are a couple of suggestions:

The AIC Great “O” Antiphons videos for each of the last seven days in Advent, with prayers, antiphons, illustrations and music. Program length: 10-12 min.   Podcast versions in MP3 format are linked from the Podcast Archive page.

December 18th – O Sapientia

December 19th – O Adonai

December 20th – O Radix Jesse

December 21st – O Clavis David

December 22nd – O Oriens

December 23rd – O Rex Gentium

December 24th-Emmanuel

 

 

 

 

New Testament: Gospels – Episode 20

 

Christ-Healing Ten Lepers-Echternach-Detail-96dpi
Healing the Ten Lepers, Codex Aureus of Echternach, 1030-1050 A.D.  German National Library, Nuremberg, Germany.

Episode Twenty in the AIC’s The New Testament: Gospels Bible Study Video series was completed in the revised version earlier today and was uploaded this afternoon.  Topics include the final unique parable, the Pharisee and the Tax Collector (Publican in KJV); plus commentary on unique content including the Raising of the Son of the Widow of Nain, the Healing of the Ten Lepers and the Sending and Return of the Seventy.    Other illustrations are an engraving by Gustav Dore’, two watercolors by James Tissot, and an early 13th C. miniature illumination of Jesus Teaching (originally used to illustrate Matthew 5).

 

This week’s featured illustration is from the Codex Aureus of Echternach, produced in the 2nd Qtr of the 11th C. at the Benedictine Monastery of St. Willibrod, Echternach, then Germany and now Luxembourg, from the collection of the German National Library, Nuremberg, Germany, which acquired the manuscript in the 20th C. in order to keep it in Germany.   In the original the scene was paired with the Healing of Blind Bartimaeus on the bottom line on a three-line page with six scenes..  The 96 dpi version barely does justice to the original. I’ve limited its size in order to enhance the detail.

Watch Episode Twenty.     Listen to the Podcast of Episode Twenty

Episode Twenty-one and Episode Twenty-two were recorded yesterday.  I have now completed the rebuild of the script and slides for Episode Forty-five, the final episode on the Gospel of St. John.  On the present schedule I hope to complete and release one video/podcast per week through the end of the year and complete the uploads in January A.D. 2020.  I’ll have to double up somewhere, with two per week, if my voice will permit, in order to complete the work by then.

As always, thanks for you interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Next Four Revised Podcast Homilies for Trinity Season

After a one-week delay the next four revised Podcast Homilies for Fourteenth through Eighteenth Sundays after Trinity are now linked from the Podcast Homilies page.  The remaining revisions should be completed before 21 June.  Apologies to our regular viewers for the delay.

Meanwhile, I’ve been working on revisions to the New Testament: Gospels video series and expect to begin uploading the episodes on the Gospel of St. Mark before the end of June 2019 A.D.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Another Four Podcast Homilies

As promised last week, the next four revised Podcast Homilies for Trinity Season, for Eleventh through Fourteenth Sunday, have now been uploaded.  My plan is to complete the series before 15 June, with T-15 to T-18 during the week of Memorial Day.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

New Testament: Gospels – Episode Four

Christ-Entry into Jerusalem-Giotto-Scrovegni Chapel
Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem, Miniature fresco, middle tier, north wall, Scrovegni Chapel, Padua, Italy, Giotto di Bondoni, 1304-1306.  Public Domain.

Episode Four in the revised New Testament: Gospels Bible Study Video series, delayed last week owing to technical issues, is now online.  The focus continues on the Life of Christ as fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy.  The episode begins with the coming of John the Baptist fulfilling prophecies of Isaiah and Malachi and ends with the Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem.   The featured illustration for this post is miniature fresco of scenes in the Life of Christ by Italian artist Giotto di Bondoni from his series of frescoes on the north wall, Scrovegni Chapel, Padua, Italy.

WATCH EPISODE FOUR

LISTEN TO EPISODE FOUR PODCAST

Trinitytide: The Teaching Season – Episode Seven

Matthew-Writing-BritLibr-late15th C-Russian-PCA1
St. Matthew Writing His Gospel.  Colored ink and gilt on parchment illumination by Master Michael Medovartsev, Russia, last quarter, 15th C.; MSS Egerton 3045, Folio 10v, Byzantine Illuminations, British Library, London, England.  Perspective correction applied.

Episode Seven in the AIC’s newest Seasonal Video series is now available in both video and podcast versions.  The subjects are the Collect, Epistle and Gospel readings for Sixthteenth through Nineteenth Sundays after Trinity, which includes four more writings from the Pauline Epistles and two pericopes each from the Gospels of St. Luke (Raising of the Son of the Widow of Nain; Healing of the Blind Man with dropsy; and the Parable of the Chief Seats) and St. Matthew (The Greatest Commandment question and the Healing of Palsied Man).

Watch the Video of Episode 7.    Listen to the Podcast version of Episode 7

The episode includes 13 illustrations (not counting repeat uses) from the 6th C. through the early 20th C.  I’ve added more images to our archive of St. Paul but also found another image of St. Matthew, whose images are quite hard to find.  This one is from a Russian Gospel book produced in the last quarter of the 15th C., showing St. Matthew composing his Gospel.  The colors, textures and tones are exceptional. The work is credited to a monk, Michael Medovartsev.  It comes from the Egerton MSS 3045, Folio 10v from the Byzantine illuminated manuscripts collection at the British Library, London, England.

One of the changes made during this series is better correction of what is said and presented in each episode with similar work in the AIC archive of videos, podcast and publications.   Each episode closes with a short review of source, date, episode or page number of our Bookstore publications, Seasonal and Christian Education video, and Bible Study videos.  I hope viewers find the information useful.

The script, slides and sound for Episode Eight and Episode Nine, the final episode, are complete.  The work that remains is coordination of the sound to the pictures.  I hope to complete that work during the next two weeks.

The next work in the series is Advent: A Season of Penitence and Preparation, which will premier in late September or early October.  The format will be the same as the other Seasonal Videos based on the seasons in the Church Year.  Content will incorporate some material available in existing AIC videos and books.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Please consider sharing this site with others or following the blog by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church tab in the far right column on the web site below my picture.  Your help increases the chances of greater public knowledge of these resources.

May the Lord bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Glory be to God for all things!  Amen.

Trinitytide: The Teaching Season – Episode Four

Paul-Lucas_van_Leyden-circa 1520
The Apostle Paul by Lucas van Leyden, circa 1520 A.D., Yale University Art Gallery,  Public Domain.

As promised last week, Episode Four in the Trinitytide series is now available in both video and podcast versions.   I’ve used several of the images of St, Paul which have been added to our library either from the public domain or from various picture vendors.   The most unusual one is today’s featured image, an oil on panel by Dutch painter and sculptor Lucas van Leyden, painted circa 1520 A.D. and now in the collection at Yale University Gallery of Art, New Haven, CT.   It is distinctly Western and presents St. Paul as if he were one of van Leyden’s clients sitting in his studio for a portrait, as opposed to the more fierce facial expression and bodily pose favored in Eastern Church art.  As is customary in Western Church art, St. Paul holds a book and a sword, the latter a symbol of the manner of his death.  Traditional accounts say that St. Paul was beheaded outside Rome around 68 A.D. during the reign of Emperor Nero.  Many claims have been made about the whereabouts of his remains, but not, as far as I am aware, are widely accepted.

Episode Four provides the full texts and origin of the Collects for Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Sundays after Trinity.  Commentary, summaries and key quotations are provided for the Epistle and Gospel readings.   I’ve also mentioned the next three of the eleven hymns to the Holy Trinity from The St. Chrysostom Hymnal.  The final two hymns will be mentioned in Episode Five, which is focused on the Ninth, Tenth and Eleventh Sundays after Trinity.

Watch the Video.              Listen to the Podcast

This coming week I will be acquiring three more impressions of St. Paul, all three in stained glass from the 19th C, including his Conversion, the warning of Agabus concerning his arrest, and a full size, frontal view of St. Paul with book and sword.

As always, I thank viewers for their interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Why We Do It

I’ve been reviewing reader/viewer comments and various email message concerning the Anglican Internet Church, particularly its various presences on the Web.  Two common threads, not actually spoken, are Why the Seasonal Videos; Why the Focus on the 1928 B.C.P.?; and Why No Actual Video of the author?   I hope the following provides readers/viewer with acceptable answers.

Seasonal Videos:  One of the original objectives of the AIC, when it was just the broadcast arm of St. John Chrysostom Anglican Church at St. Joseph’s Villa Chapel, Richmond, VA, was to extend the reach of traditional homilies and traditional local doctrinal teaching and Bible Study.  Today, the AIC reaches a broad audience in many parts of the world.  The Seasonal Videos, which will eventually include programs on the entire Church Calendar, offer viewers and listeners through the Podcast version, are a way of providing traditional teaching, easily-available, without either going over the heads of the viewers or insulting their intelligence — and giving them a glimpse of the treasures of Church art from both the Western and Eastern Church.

Why the B,C.P. Focus:  The greatest treasure left to Anglicans by the English Reformation is the American 1928 Book of Common Prayer (as amended in the 1940s).  The liturgies provided, especially for Holy Communion, provide a valuable link backwards in time to the early Church both at Rome and at Constantinople and at Antioch, Alexandria, Jerusalem and the many Christian communities throughout Asia Minor.  Every time an Anglican hears a Collect read he or she is reminded of the continuity of the Christian heritage which came down from the Apostles through the clergy, bishops, and archbishops who defended the Nicene Creed in the face of “reform” movements.  The Seasonal Videos, with their focus on how the Calendar is brought to life in Holy Communion or Morning Prayer, help Anglicans understand exactly where these beliefs came from, including the source of the Collects; provide the short summaries of the Epistle and Gospel readings, with appropriate religious art; and enrich the experience with commentary on appropriate Seasonal Music from The St. Chrysostom Hymnal, which is offered as a supplement to the 1940 Hymnal.

Why No Actual Videos of the Author:   All our video series, whether in the Bible Study, Seasonal, or Christian Education categories, are intended to keep the focus on the content.   Nothing would be gained by watching the author while he narrates a video.  In fact, I believe, such video content would take time away from both the Script and the extensive archive of icons, frescoes, mosaics, engravings, paintings, watercolors, illuminated manuscripts, bas reliefs, statues, monuments, and church buildings, all of which, I hope, leave the viewer reminded that 21st C. Christians are not alone!  We are part of a continuing legacy begun by the teaching, healing, preaching, Nativity, Crucifixion, and Resurrection of Jesus Christ and by the untiring work of His Apostles, whether of the 1st C., or the 4th when the Nicene  Creed was written; or the 5th-6th-7th-8th C. when most of the Collects were composed; or in all the intervening years until the 21st C.  That legacy remains alive, vibrant, and threatening to the secular world as long as modern day Christians continue to worship God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit, constantly reminded by the words of the liturgies spoken by millions of Christians who have come before us.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God continue to bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!

Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

 

Episode 6 – The War on Christianity

WOC-Slide80The long-delayed Episode Six in the AIC Christian Education video series The War on Christianity is now online in both video and podcast versions.   Subtitled “The First Line of Defense,” the episode is focused on Part One of the Te Deum Laudamus canticle (from the opening sentence to “also the Holy Ghost, the Comforter”).  The episode includes a summary of the canticle’s history and a verse-by-verse commentary on its meaning and Scriptural warrant, with illustrations from the 6th through the 21st C.  This powerful and inspiring Canticle is the first suggested Canticle (or “Hymn” in the rubric in page 10) following the First Lesson in Morning Prayer.

The Te Deum Laudamus, so named after its first words in Latin, meaning We praise Thee, O God, is among the very best summaries of the most essential doctrines of Christianity — everything from angels, cherubim and seraphim; martyrs and apostles; to the Holy Spirit.   The slides include an annotated version of the text with emphasis and pause indicators.  To save time in the presentation, the text is read rather than chanted.   This episode is the first of several on the concept of understanding the teachings of the Church as the best “first line of defense” for individual Christians in the secular world’s on-going War on Christianity.

Watch Episode Six.    Listen to the Podcast of Episode Six.

Episode Seven, focused on Parts Two and Three, will be uploaded later in February or in the first full week of March.

As always, thank you for your interest in and support of The Anglican Internet Church’s online ministry.  You can help expand our reach by subscribing to this Blog by clicking the “Follow Anglican Internet Church” tab in the right side column.  Our site host, WordPress.com, will notify you of the latest posts.

May God bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Glory be to God for all tings! Amen!