Bible Study Videos – Episode Thirteen

Annunciation-Meister_der_Braunschweig-Magdeburger_Schule_1275
THE ANNUNCIATION.  The Archangel Gabriel and the Blessed Virgin presented in tempera and gilt on vellum, circa 1275 A.D., attributed to the Master of the Braunschweig-Magdeburg School, from the Austrian National Library, Vienna, Austria, as reproduced in The Yorck Project: 10,000 Masterworks. Public domain.

In what I think is the best episode yet in the revised and expanded version of the AIC Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels is now available.  Episode Thirteen features many rarely-seen illustrations from the 11th, 13th, 18th, 19th and 2nd Qtr 20th C. to aid in viewer/listener comprehension of the Gospel of St. Luke.

Watch the Video.          Listen to the Podcast

The focus in Episode Thirteen is on the second and best known of three “annunciations” in the Gospel of St Luke, in this case “The” Annunciation to the Blessed Virgin by the Archangel Gabriel; the first two of 4 songs in the Gospel of St. Luke, the Magnificat and the Benedictus, the latter occasioned by the birth of John the Baptist and the loosening of the tongue of Zacharias.

Personally, I really miss the congregational singing of the Benedictus (as well as the Jubilate Deo and the Te Deum laudamus).  No musical instrument, no matter how well played can equal the emotional feeling of united voices singing the theological songs.

I have completed both the sound and pictures for Episode Fourteen and will complete the video and upload it next week.  I am currently prepared the slides and script for Episode Thirty-two, on the Gospel of St. John.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Pls consider using the Follow Anglican Internet Church legend in the righthand column to add your name so that you can receive notice of all future blog postings.

 

More Revised Podcast Homilies

I’ve now uploaded the first four Podcast Homilies in the revised series for Church Year 2018-2019 for Whitsunday and Trinity season.   These four, including Whitsunday, Trinity Sunday, First Sunday after Trinity and Second Sunday after Trinity, are linked from the Podcast Homilies page, with episodes listed in order according to the Church Calendar.  I anticipate recording the next four, Third Sunday after Trinity through Sixth Sunday after Trinity early next week.  The simple reason for the stretched-out schedule is that four episodes are all I can do without stress on either or both my voice and my back!   After four I begin to sound like a croaking frog – and we don’t want that!

Christ-with Father-Royal 1 D X-f98-PCA
God the Father and God the Son, illumination in colored inks and gold on parchment, perspective correction applied, Ms. Royal 1 D X, Folio 98, British Library, London, England.

In my search for images for the video series for Trinity Season I used a few Western Church images which violate the ancient early Church prohibition (still followed in the Eastern Church) against images of the God the Father.  Andrei Rublev avoided the problem by using the three figures who visited Abraham.  In later research I found something appealing from the English Church tradition, from an early 13th C. Psalter made near Oxford before 1220 A.D.   The image of God the Father and God the Son are mirror likenesses inside a capital letter “O.”

As always, thank you for your continued interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name. Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

The New Testament: Gospels – Episode One

NT-Gospels-Title1-rev

After repeated delays for technical reasons, Episode One in the revised AIC Bible Study Video series, The New Testament: Gospels, is now available in both video and podcast version.   The new version is the third to be produced.  The first was a series of live videocasts from my former parish.  The second edition was introduced in A.D. 2015 after my retirement from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014.

Version Three includes many improvements, including a revised format more consistent with the style of the more recent AIC videos; many more examples of historic art from the 6th through the 20th C. from archives which have been digitized for wider audiences; and more direct quotations of Scripture, especially in the episodes on the Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Mark, which were the earliest in the series presented in a different format than later episodes.   The series retains the original focus on teaching for the Laity and the informal style of presentation.

Watch the Video of Episode One                   Listen to the Podcast of Episode One

Harley  5785 f 187v
Luke Writing from Ms Harley 5785, Folio 187v, perspective correction applied, British Library, London, England.

Among the examples of historic art included in Episode One is Luke Writing His Gospel, an illumination in tempera and gold on parchment produced in the region of Constantinople in the late 11th to early 12th C.  I applied perspective correction to the original image from Ms Harley 5785, Folio 187v, British Library, London, England.   Our archive now includes nearly a thousand such images from libraries, museums, churches, and government archives in England, Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Russia, Macedonia, Bulgaria and the United States.   These historic images are both beautiful and instructive on the spiritual message in the scenes depicted.  I have included works in nearly every artistic medium, including icons, frescos, mosaics, oil paintings, watercolors, etchings and engravings.  All examples which have been modified for correction of perspective and other flaws with the objective of presenting a finished work more like its original shape are so identified in the credit lines.  Examples from many libraries and other sources can only be used for non-commerical purposes.  I have removed the links to all video and podcast versions of the earlier series.

The text and slides for Episode Two through Episode Sixteen, the latter including material from the opening chapters of the Gospel of St. Luke, have been completed.  Each needs to be converted into video form, which is a multi-step and time-consuming process, but I hope to release one episode per week throughout 2019 A.D. until all 45 episodes in the series are complete.   Things that can upset the schedule include the temptation to go back into finished work to add historic art more recently discovered.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Podcast Homilies Redux

I have now finished Phase I of the rebuilding of the Podcast Homilies page I announced in October.  Viewers and listeners will now find new links to freshly-recorded versions of my four theme-word or theme-phrase homilies for the Four Sundays in Advent; plus new Podcast Homilies for Christmas Day, First Sunday after Christmas Day, and Second Sunday after Christmas Day; and revised homilies for Epiphany (Day) and all six Sundays after Epiphany.  Within each homily are internal cross-references to Other AIC Resources on the same words, readings, topics or phrases.

These Other AIC Resources include:

  • Seasonal Videos:  our now-complete array of Seasonal Videos beginning with our two episode series, Advent: a Season of Penitence & Preparation, and ending with our nine episode series, Trinitytide: the Teaching Season.  Seasonal Videos are linked from the Digital Library page, displayed in order of the seasons on the Anglican Church Calendar.
  • Bible Study Videos:   both our Bible Study Video series, New Testament: Gospels (presented in 44 episodes) and Revelation presented in 28 episodes.  New episodes in the New Testament series will be recorded during late Winter and Spring, 2019 A.D.  Bible Study videos are linked from the Bible Study page.
  • Christian Education Videos: These include The Nicene Creed (presented in eight episodes), The Lord’s Prayer (presented in two episodes), The Lives of the Saints (presented in two series); and the on-going series The War on Christianity.  Christian Education Videos are linked from the Digital Library page, following the Seasonal Video links.
  • AIC Bookstore Publications:  all our books are available by special order from commercial bookstores and through the Virtual Bookstore link on the Home Page, which connects viewers to my Amazon Author page.  There will likely be one new books added in 2019 A.D., a Nativity account using the complete text from the Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Luke, illustrated with many of the historic works of art which were used for the Seasonal Video series.

Phase 2 in the rebuild, to be completed in January A.D. 2019, will include revised Podcast Homilies, with internal cross-references, for Gesima (Pre-Lent); Lent; and Easter.   The texts for all three seasons have been written and need only a final review before recording.  Texts for Good Friday remain unchanged, since they were revised in Spring A.D. 2018.   Phase 3, to be completed in February A.D. 2019, will include Podcast Homilies for Whitsunday/Pentecost, Trinity Sunday and the Sundays after Trinity.   The texts for Trinity season are only in the early stage of editing.   Both Phase 2 and Phase 3 will be work to be accomplished in the cold, dark and wet days of Winter in Virginia, when working on the yard, garden and house cannot be comfortably accomplished.

Please consider becoming a Follower of this blog by clicking the “Follow Anglican Internet Church” tab in upper area of the right-hand column.  You’ll be asked to enter your email address in order to receive notice from our vendor, WordPress.com, of all new postings.   Be assured that the AIC does not share such information with any other organization or with any vendor.

As always, thank you for your interest in and support of this unique Internet-based ministry.  May God continue to bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!   Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

The Podcast Homilies Rebuild

Just a little bit of introspection today.  I thought readers might want to know what’s in store for 2019 A.D. at the AIC web site.  With the coming completion of the Seasonal Video series (with Christmas: The Nativity of Our Lord‘s Episode Two in late October), attention turns to restructuring the Podcast Homilies platform, last changed early in 2015 A.D.

The Podcast Homilies page grew out of the 12-15 minutes homilies I delivered before my retirement from pulpit ministry.  The PH series is primarily focused on the Epistle and Gospel readings for the Sundays in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.   The restructuring will involved integrating the Podcast Homilies into the inventory of teaching material available through Other AIC Resources.    For each of the Podcast Homilies I will add mentions of where the verses cited in the script are used in the 1928 B.C.P. liturgies and also cross-referencing each homily to where the same words, phrases, concepts, subjects are treated in Other AIC materials.

When the project is complete, hopefully by late Winter 2018-2019 A,D., readers and listeners will be able to take full advantage of the greatly-enlarged library of materials available on or through the AIC Web Site.  For example: in a homily which includes a reading from the Gospel of St. Luke, there will be cross-references to where the same reading appears in our Bible Study video series New Testament: Gospels; the appropriate Seasonal Video series with episode number; appropriate Christian Education series (Nicene Creed; Lord’s Prayer; Lives of the Saints; The War on Christianity); appropriate AIC Bookstore Publications, especially Layman’s Lexicon.

As always, thank you for your interest and support for this online ministry.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

Trinitytide: The Teaching Season – Episode Three

Luke-with Symbol-2nd Version- Gospel of Otto III
Luke the Evangelist with his traditional symbol, the Ox,an illumination strongly influenced by the Byzantine-style, from THE GOSPELS OF OTTO III, painted in tempera and gilt on parchment at the Benedictine Monastery on Reichenau Island, Lake Constance, Southern Germany, in the mid-11th C. The original is at the Bavarian State Library, Munich, Germany. Public Domain.

Episode Three in our newest Seasonal Video series, Trinitytide: The Teaching Season is now available in both video and podcast version.  There are thirteen illustrations which, I hope, help increase understanding of the Collect, Epistle and Gospel reading for Third Fourth and Fifth Sundays after Trinity.   The one chosen for this Blog entry is from the late Ottonian Empire, successor to the revived Holy Roman Empire started by Charlesmagne.  AIC regulars will remember that Otto III was responsible for the production of the Bamberg Apocalypse, now at the Bamberg State Library, Bamberg, Germany and used in the AIC Bookstore publication, Revelation: An Idealist Interpretation.

Watch the video version.

Listen to the Podcast version

The episode includes the only two readings from the writings of St. Peter during Trinity Season.  The Gospel readings jump back and forth on the historical timeline and include the Parables of the Lost Sheep and Lost Coin (Luke 15:1-10); the Parable of the Blind Leading the Blind (Luke 6:36-42); and the calling of the first four Disciples (Luke 5:1-11).   In my related Podcast Homily (linked from the Podcast Homilies page) for Fifth Sunday after Trinity I explain the early Church understanding of why Jesus was seated while the people stood and the spiritual meaning of “Launch out into the deep” (Luke 5:4).  For those who like a dose of Church history, I offer an interesting observation on a change in wording of the Collect for the same Sunday made in the 1662 B.C.P.

I also include mention the next three of 11 Trinitarian hymns not in the venerable 1940 Hymnal from the AIC Bookstore publication, The St. Chrysostom Hymnal.  The theme music for the video is again Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty, played by Richard M. S. Irwin from his dedicated web page: https://play.hymnswithoutwords.com.  I thank Richard for granting permission of its use.  The hymn is always inspirational, but played by Richard on his church organ, it truly represents the majesty of Reginald Huber’s original scoring.

I have started work on Episode Four in the series, which will be available in late June, will feature the Collect, Epistle and Gospel readings for the Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Sundays after Trinity and the next three of 11 hymns to the Trinity.   The readings will require more research in suitable illustrations readers/viewers might not have seen.

As always, thank you for your interest in and support of this online ministry dedicated to traditional teaching of the ancient Christian Faith.  Please consider clicking the “Follow Anglican Internet Church” tab in the far right column.  You’ll be asked to enter your email address if you wish to receive notice of each new posting.

May God bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

 

 

 

 

;

Mea culpa, mea culpa

AGreat Supper-Jan Lukyen-Bowyer Biblepologies to readers/viewers for the incorrect attribution of a scene in Episode Two of Trinitytide: The Teaching Season.  The credit line for Jan Luyken’s etching of the Invitation to the Great Supper should have read:

Invitation to the Great Supper  Late 17th-early 18th C. etching by Dutch artist Jan Luyken, The Bowyer Bible, Bolton Library, Bolton, England, published, London, 1840 A.D. Public Domain photography by Harry Kossuth and text by Phillip Medhurst, Early Life of Christ in the Bowyer Bible, 2018 A.D. electronic edition.

There are several other examples from The Bowyer Bible which will be used in remaining episodes in the series.  These will bear the correct credit line.   Again, thanks for your interest and support.

 

Trinitytide – Episode Two

Somehow, with all the other issues which needed attention this week, I completed and uploaded Episode Two in the AIC Seasonal Video series, Trinitytide: The Teaching Season.  This episode is focused on the Collects and readings for Trinity Sunday, First Sunday after Trinity and Second Sunday after Trinity, plus seasonal music.

As a teaching season it should be no surprise that major doctrinal issues are covered through both the Collects and the Epistle-Gospel combinations.  The season starts with a rare liturgical reading from Revelation (Revelation 4:1-11), with the heavenly voice like a trumpet inviting St. John to “come up here” for a view of events to come from a heavenly perspective and the iconic pericope from the Gospel of St. John (John 3:1-15) recounting the nighttime visit of Nicodemus.

Rich Man and Lazarus-Codex_Aureus
Codex Aureus of Echternach, Folio 78, 1035-1040 A.D., Benedictine Abbey, Reichenau Island, Lake Constance, Germany; National Library of Germany, Nuremberg, Germany.  Public domain.

Week Two moves along to St. John’s essay on Love (Greek: agape) (1 John 4:7-21), which is paired with St. Luke’s account of the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus.  For the latter I chose a strikingly Byzantine-style representation painted in three panels at the Benedictine Monastery on Reichenau Island in southern Germany during the mid-11th C.   The dinner is shown in the top row; the fate of Lazarus (in the “Bosom of Abraham”) in the second; and the Rich Man in, fittingly, the lower tier.

 

In week three, the final set of readings are another of St. John’s essays on love, plus the need for putting it into action, and St. Luke’s version of the Parable of the Great Supper, delivered much earlier that the Wedding Supper account in St. Matthew’s Gospel.

I’ve also included mention of the first three of 11 hymns to the Holy Trinity in The St. Chrysostom Hymnal which are not in the venerable 1940 Hymnal.  The remaining hymns will be mentioned in remaining episodes in the series.

The series continues in Episode Three with discussion of the next three Sundays after Trinity.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

Trinitytide: the Teaching Season – Episode One

Holy_Spirit-Descent-Belarussian-18thC
Descent of the Holy Spirit, Russian Orthodox tempera and gilt on panel icon, 18th C., National Arts Museum of the Republic of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus.  Public Domain.

At last!  Glitches overcome (or fixed), on Wednesday morning I completed and uploaded Part 1 and Part 2 of Episode One in the newest AIC Season Video series, Trinitytide: the Teaching Season.  As noted in a previous blog posting, the episode ran too long and was split into two parts.  There is only a transition slide between the end of Part 1 and the start of Part 2 so viewers will need to watch Part 2 to hear the discussion of seasonal music for Whitsunday and Whitsun Week.

For thematic focus (after all, this is a teaching video series) I included a discussion of Whitsunday and a short history of Trinity season and its relationship to Pentecost in the new Trinitytide series.   Viewers will find an outstanding collection of illustrations in Episode One, with 15 of them on the first Pentecost.  Many are rarely seen in the Western Church, except among religious scholars and art historians.  The oldest Pentecost illustration was made in 586 A.D.  The most recent example was prepared near the end of the 19th or early in the 20th C.   Viewers will also learn about the 14th person in the Byzantine icons of Pentecost (12 Apostles, the Blessed Virgin, and — watch and find out).

Watch Episode One-Part 1.     Listen to the Podcast of Episode One-Part 1

Watch Episode One-Part 2.     Listen to the Podcast of Episode One-Part 2

Episode Two in the series will be focused on Trinity Sunday, First Sunday after Trinity and Second Sunday after Trinity, plus more seasonal music from The St. Chrysostom Hymnal.  I expect to have the episode ready next week or the following week.

As always, thanks for your interest in and support for this Internet-based ministry which seeks to teach traditional Christian doctrine and practice to the faithful wherever they live — and make it available 24/7.

May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!

Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

Glitches & Other Issues

Last week I avowed to finish production of Episode One in Trinitytide; The Teaching Season.  Alas, glitches, several of them, caused me to delay production by one week.  In addition to typographical errors, difficulties with sentence structure, there is the fact that the final recording ran over 40 minutes.

The problem will be resolved by splitting the episode into two parts, with a transition slide at the end of Part One and a new opening slide for Part Two.   Part One will contain all the introductory material on Trinity Season as well as the B.C.P. readings for Whitsunday.  Part Two will not have a separate introduction but will continue where the first episode left off (with a new opening slide only) and include discussion of Monday and Tuesday in Whitsun Week plus seasonal music for Whitsuntide and Trinity season from The St. Chrysostom Hymnal.

All the changes have been made to both script and slides and I anticipate being able to record both Part One and Part Two on Monday.  Unless there are other glitches, I expect to complete and upload the finished programs before the end of next week, well ahead of Whitsunday.

Thanks for your patience, continued interest, and on-going support.

May God bless you in all that you do in His Name! Amen.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!