Preview of 2019 A.D. Projects

Great new changes are coming next year.  Instead of investing a lot of time and energy in a proposed Nativity book, I’ve decided to upgrade our existing 45-episode Bible Study Video series.   The Bible Study video series began as live streaming-video programs broadcast from my former parish nearly a decade ago.  Since the original version was produced, the AIC’s style of videos has changed dramatically, both in content and in appearance on the screen.   In addition, the new version will eliminate all obsolete references to persons, places and programs which are no longer relevant to the AIC’s online ministry.

For the new series, which as you see, has a new, more accurate title, the programs will incorporate the new style made possible by a change in software and the broadening of the AIC’s library of historic art.  We now have access to almost 1,000 images, including illuminations, icons, mosaics, frescoes, paintings, engravings, etchings and historic documents the oldest dating to the 3rd century.    The image in the title slide is the first page from the Gospel of St. John from a late 9th C.-early 10th C. illuminated Gospel made in Belgium.   The book is known by many names, the Coronation Gospels, the Athelstan Gospels and the Cotton Gospels.  Inprincipio is Latin for “In the beginning…”, the opening words of St. John’s prelude to this unique Gospel account.  The original is in the digital collections of the British Library, London, England.

Another major change to be incorporated into the revised Bible Study series is internal cross-referencing to Other AIC Resources on the same topics, words, phrases or theological concepts, including our Christian Education and Seasonal Videos; Podcast Homilies (also being revised and expanded in 2019 A.D.), and the AIC Bookstore Publications.   My objective is to help viewers take full advantage of the resources provided through the AIC Web Site, most of which are offered free of charge.   

As always, thank you for your interest in and support for this online ministry.  I invite you to “follow” the blog by clicking the Follow Anglican Internet Church banner in the top right of the page.  You’ll be asked to enter your email address in order to receive notice from WordPress.com of all new postings.   We do not share our email list with any other entity.  And please consider sharing your knowledge of this site with others seeking traditional Christian teachings.

May the Lord bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Christmas: The Nativity of Our Lord – Episode One

Christ-Nativity & Annun-Egbert_codex-Detail1-PCAI’ve completed and uploaded Episode One in Christmas: The Nativity of Our Lord, part of the final link in our chain of teaching videos for all the seasons in the 1928 Book of Common Prayer.  The series will have two episodes.  Episode One offers discussion of the evolution of the Christmas tradition; Anglican traditions of Christmas; and discussion and reading of both the first and second set of Collect, Epistle and Gospel readings for Christmas Day.   The series is illustrated with material from the 10th through the 20th C.  The oldest is a Byzantine-style illumination of the Nativity and the Annunciation to the Shepherds from the Codex Egberti, a Gospel book prepared in the Scriptorium of the Reichenau Monastery, Reichenau, Germany, between 980 and 993 A.D. for the incumbent bishop of Trier.  I applied perspective correction to the original file.  The Codex is part of the collection at the Trier Library, Trier, Germany.

Watch the video.     Listen to the Podcast.

Other illustrations include an early 11th C. illumination from the Bamberg Apocalypse; a 14th C. French depiction of the coronation of Charlesmagne at Rome in 800 A.D.; a 14th C. oil on panel of Malachi by Duccio di Buoninsegna; a 10th C. depiction of St. John writing his Gospel from the Ottonian era of the Holy Roman Empire; a 13th C. mosaic at the Basilica of St. Mark, Venice; a circa 1420 A.D. Nativity scene in colored inks on parchment made in the Netherlands; F. X. Zettler’s elegant and beautiful stained glass window of the Nativity at St. Gertrude’s Church, Stockholm, Sweden; and Nativity murals from St. Joseph’s Villa Chapel, Richmond, Va from the AIC Bookstore publication, Paintings on Light.

Episode Two has been recorded but not yet place into video format.  It is focused on First Sunday after Christmas Day, Second Sunday after Christmas Day; the AIC Seasonal Video series, The Twelve Days of Christmas, soon to be available in a new edition; and, finally, the fourteen hymns in The St. Chrysostom Hymnal that are either not in the venerable 1940 Hymnal or are used by different, more easily-sung tunes.

I will also be recording new versions of The Great “O” Antiphons and Lessons and Carols for Christmas Eve in late October and early November.  I spoke yesterday at a Clericus of the Orthodox Anglican Church, meeting at St. Joseph’s Villa Chapel, on the topic, The Mistaken Quest for Relevance.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Please consider clicking on the “Follow Anglican Internet Church” legend.  You’ll be asked for your email address and will receive automatic notice fro of all future Blog postings.   We do not share email addresses with any other organization.