Trinitytide: The Teaching Season – Episode Four

Paul-Lucas_van_Leyden-circa 1520
The Apostle Paul by Lucas van Leyden, circa 1520 A.D., Yale University Art Gallery,  Public Domain.

As promised last week, Episode Four in the Trinitytide series is now available in both video and podcast versions.   I’ve used several of the images of St, Paul which have been added to our library either from the public domain or from various picture vendors.   The most unusual one is today’s featured image, an oil on panel by Dutch painter and sculptor Lucas van Leyden, painted circa 1520 A.D. and now in the collection at Yale University Gallery of Art, New Haven, CT.   It is distinctly Western and presents St. Paul as if he were one of van Leyden’s clients sitting in his studio for a portrait, as opposed to the more fierce facial expression and bodily pose favored in Eastern Church art.  As is customary in Western Church art, St. Paul holds a book and a sword, the latter a symbol of the manner of his death.  Traditional accounts say that St. Paul was beheaded outside Rome around 68 A.D. during the reign of Emperor Nero.  Many claims have been made about the whereabouts of his remains, but not, as far as I am aware, are widely accepted.

Episode Four provides the full texts and origin of the Collects for Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Sundays after Trinity.  Commentary, summaries and key quotations are provided for the Epistle and Gospel readings.   I’ve also mentioned the next three of the eleven hymns to the Holy Trinity from The St. Chrysostom Hymnal.  The final two hymns will be mentioned in Episode Five, which is focused on the Ninth, Tenth and Eleventh Sundays after Trinity.

Watch the Video.              Listen to the Podcast

This coming week I will be acquiring three more impressions of St. Paul, all three in stained glass from the 19th C, including his Conversion, the warning of Agabus concerning his arrest, and a full size, frontal view of St. Paul with book and sword.

As always, I thank viewers for their interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Published by

Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he devotes his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

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