Trinitytide: The Teaching Season – Episode Six

GoodSamaritan-RossanoGospels-Folio007-Detail1
Detail, the Parable of the Good Samaritan, an illumination in colored inks and gilt on parchment,the Rossano Gospels, Cathedral of Rossano, Rossano, Italy, 6th C.  Public Domain.

I just finished uploading Episode Six in our Seasonal Video series Trinitytide: The Teaching Season.  The focus this time is on the Collect, Epistle and Gospel readings for Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Fifteenth Sundays after Trinity.  There are sixteen illustrations, ranging from a 6th C. illumination from Byzantine-controlled Italy to an early 20th C. oil on canvas of Mammon depicted as a sitting deity.   The four Gospel pericopes include the Healing of the Deaf Man, the Parable of the Good Samaritan, the Healing of the Ten Lepers, and God vs. Mammon (or Two Masters).  Of course, there are four new readings from the pen of St. Paul, of whom I have included four images which I have not used previously: two 19th C. stained glass windows in England (one in East Anglia, the other in Kensington/London); and two oil on canvas works in the European tradition.

Watch the video.               Listen to the Podcast.

My favorite this week, shown above left, is a detail of the Parable of the Good Samaritan which I extracted from the Rossano Gospels,  a colored ink and gilt illumination on purple-dyed parchment, one of oldest to survive to the present day.  It was made in Italy in the 6th C., after the army of the Byzantine Empire at Constantinople conquered much of Italy.  Of course, its style is clearly Byzantine.  The Byzantine artist inserted an angel as a suggestion of the presence of Christ in the heart of the Good Samaritan.  The dying of parchment in purple was a very popular thing in the first Millennium and into the early part of the second.

In my research for these episodes I’ve discovered some new archives I had not known about and who resources I will be mining in future months, especially for images of St. Paul and the four Gospel authors, plus individual page illuminations from Gospels, Lectionaries and other works intended for personal devotions.  I think the lives of Christians would be immensely enriched if these were currently available for home devotions.  Perhaps the AIC will produce one in 2019 A.D.  I was thinking along the lines of introducing color introductions into Hear Us, O Lord: Daily Prayers for the Laity.  Unfortunately, the price would have to double if not triple (more color, more pages equals higher printing costs).

The slides and script for Episode Seven, covering the Sixteenth through Nineteenth Sundays after Trinity, are nearly complete.  I hope viewers will be as amazed as I am at the illustrations for Episode Seven and pleased with the longer treatment of several of the Gospel lessons.  The episode probably will not be finished until the following week owing to some personal obligations next week and the 4th of July holiday.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Adding yourself to the list of followers either on the AIC web site, especially the Fr. Ron’s blog page; our Podbean channel and our YouTube channel, is very helpful in assisting me in reaching more people with the traditional Christian message and interpretation.

May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!  Amen!  Glory be to God for all things! Amen!

Published by

Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he devotes his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

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