First Sunday After Trinity and Revelation – Episode 10

It was exciting and very satisfying yesterday to have completed and uploaded both a Podcast Homily for First Sunday After Trinity and Episode 10 in Revelation: An Idealist Interpretation.

The Podcast Homily for First Sunday After Trinity is focused primarily on the Gospel reading from Luke 16:19-31, the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus.  For the Epistle reading I included cross-references to the First Day of Christmas video in the AIC seasonal video series, The Twelve Days of Christmas, in which the key word was LOVE. from the Greek agape.

Bosom of Abrahan - 11th Century icon from Germany, illustrating scenes from the Rich Man and Lazarus
Bosom of Abraham – 11th Century icon from Germany, illustrating scenes from the Rich Man and Lazarus

The MP3 format for podcast makes them portable and accessible to many more people, but the obvious shortcoming is the lack of pictures.  In the AIC Bible Study series, New Testament: Gospels and Epistles, when I discussed the Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus, I was able to include several illustrations, including the 11th Century icon at left.  It is painted in the Eastern Church style but within the context of the Roman Catholic tradition in Germany.  For the Bible Study series I split the icon into its three tiers, and pulling out details from each tier to suit the narrative.

The phrase “Bosom of Abraham” is unique to St. Luke’s Gospel.  It come from the Hebrew understanding that, after death, the faithful would be met by Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the patriarchs of their faith.  They believed that heaven was the place God dwelled when He was not on the Mercy Seat in the Temple.   The anonymous work shows St. Luke’s account complete with sumptuous dining in life for the Rich Man (known as Dives in the Roman Catholic tradition, from the Latin word for riches); and his resident among the flames after death’ and angels carrying Lazarus to into the Bosom of Abraham.

Listen to the Podcast Homily

I suspended production of the AIC Bible Study series, Revelation: An Idealist Interpretation in July, A.D. 2014, in order to focus on finishing the episodes in the New Testament series on the Gospel of St. John.  I found that, physically and mentally, I could not handle producing both at the same time, as the mindset for each is so different.  I expected to finish John before Christmas, but Corkie’s accident set back my schedule badly.  Episode 45, the last in the Gospels series was uploaded last week.

Episode 10 covers Chapter 5, The Lamb Opens the Scroll, which includes powerful imagery of the One who sits on the Throne and the Lamb; three doxologies, one sung by a huge chorus of angels as well as the four figures and the 24 elders; and the use of magical numbers 4, 7 and 24 (composed of 12 plus 12).  The illustrations include work from the 17th century by Jacob de Witt and the early 19th century by William Blake;and  an 11th Century French book illumination, St. John Receives His Revelation (based on a 7th Century painting from Spain.

Watch the Video     Listen to the Podcast version

If you have not already done so, I urge you to become a member of the AIC’s You Tube Google Plus circle.   You can accomplish that by clicking the Subscribe button at our You Tube site (get there using the link above).   As a Google+ member, Google will notify you of each new posting.   I plan to work on Episode 11 next week.

Thanks again for your support and interest.  As a reminder, 100% of the royalties from AIC Bookstore publications are donated to the Anglican Internet Church.  I do not receive any form of compensation or financial benefit from contributions.

Published by

Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he devotes his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s