Lives of the Saints – Episode 13

A short, 11-minute tribute to St. Bartholomew is now available on our You Tube channel and also linked from the Digital Library page at the AIC web site.  St. Bartholomew/Nathanael is honored on August 24th.

canstockphoto17198847-alt2-bartholomew.jpg
St. Bartholomew in the West Portal, c. 1190 A.D., Basilica of St. Trophime, Arles, France.  Image copyright Can Stock Photo, Inc./joymsk

There are multiple illustrations, including this c. 1190 A.D. bas relief from the West Portal at the Basilica of St. Trophime, Arles, France (the other half of the pair was used to illustrate the episode on St. James).  Other illustration are a detail from Michaelangelo’s The Last Judgment in the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican; a statue by Pierre le Gros at the Basilica of St. John Lateran, Rome; an early 20th C. picture of a now-abandoned monastery named after St. Bartholomew on the Turkey/Armenia border; a painting by Dosso Dossi; and a photograph of a church in Rome where his remains are found.

Watch the video             Listen to the Podcast

In other news, I was not able to produce the first episode of The Lord’s Prayer: Phrase-by-phrase because I do not yet have permission to use a choral chant from an Orthodox church in Oklahoma singing the Trisagion Prayer (which I planned to use in conjunction with the explanation of the meaning of Thy Will Be Done….

I have started work on The Nicene Creed and can report having found some excellent illustrative material about Emperor Constantine and the city of Nicea in the 19th and 20th Century which will  help provide the historical setting for the calling of the First Ecumenical Council at Nicea in 325 A.D.

As always, thank each of you who support this Internet-based ministry.

Published by

Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he devotes his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

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