Nicene Creed – Episode Six

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Copyright Can Stock Photo, Inc./tupungato

Episode Six is the final episode of three on what the Nicene Creed declares concerning the Lord Jesus Christ.  It begins with “And on the third day” and goes through “kingdom shall have no end.”  Illustrations for the various statements/phrases, in order of use, are Christ Victor Over Death, bas relief, Stephandom, Vienna; Christ Resurrected, 6 panels of stained glass, 19th C., location unknown; The Ascension, Eastern Orthodox icon, Bulgaria, 16th C.;  Christ Enthroned, apse mosaic (I seriously altered the original photograph to correct perspective distortion), Basilica of St. Ambrose, Milan, 13th C.; Christ Pantokrator, mosaic, Dome, Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem, late 19th C.; Christ Pantokrator, icon, Monastery of St. Catherine, Sinai, 6th C.; Icons of St. Matthew, St. Luke and St. Paul, illustrations from the Bamberg Apocalypse, early 11th C., as used in Revelation: An Idealist Interpretation, the newest AIC Bookstore publication; a Byzantine icon of the Archangel Gabriel, painted at Constantinople centuries before its removal to Moscow in 1397 A.D.; likely in anticipation of the Moslem conquest of the city; and the opening page to an American-printed edition of the Book of Psalms, early 17th C.

Watch the Episode                   Listen to the Podcast version

I have re-written the material on the last paragraph of the Nicene Creed, from “And I believe in the Holy Ghost” through the “Amen,” dividing the material into two episodes.  Episode Seven will be delayed a week, owing to my 74th birthday on the 26th.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  May God bless you in all that you do in His Name.  Amen.  Glory be to God for all things!  Amen.

 

Published by

Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he devotes his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

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