Episode Seven – The War on Christianity

WOC-Slide96aWith Episode Seven in The War on Christianity I conclude my discussion of the Te Deum Laudamus in its function as a First Line of Defense for any Christian in the world’s on-going battle with Christianity.  The focus of the discussion is Part Two (“Thou art the King of Glory: though “numbered with thy saints in glory everlasting”) and Part Three (“O Lord save thy people” through “let me never be confounded”).  I close the episode with an exploration of the Scriptural origin and usage of “confounded,” especially in the sense of its meaning as not letting oneself get led away from Christian Truth.

Watch Episode Seven.     Listen to Episode Seven.

Readers of the blog should be pleased to learn that I’ve completed all but the recording of Episode Three, the final episode, in Lent A.D. 2018, which is focused on Passion Sunday, Palm Sunday and Holy Week (including Easter Eve).  I hope to get the recording finished next week and, barring any technical glitches, get it uploaded by the end of the week or the first of the following week.

In the Cross-Slide1In other news, I’ve decided to produce a video version of In the Cross of Christ I Glory, the three-hour Good Friday meditations I developed and used in my former parish.  The videos will be produced in however many parts are required to keep each episode to under 35 minutes.  There will be Intermission slides between each of the segments so that viewers can pause the video until the appropriate hour.  There will be no separate podcast versions, since Podcasts of an earlier version are already available from the Podcast Homilies page:

  • Opening Sentences, Prayers and Responses (12:00 Noon)
  • Introduction (12:10 P.M.)
  • First Word (12:30 P.M.)
  • Second Word (12:50 P.M.)
  • Third Word (1:10 P.M.)
  • Fourth Word (1:35 P.M.)
  • Fifth Word (1:55 P.M.)
  • Sixth Word (2:15 P.M.)
  • Seventh Word (2:35 P.M.)
  • Closing Prayers (2:50 P.M.)

The videos will include many illustrations of the events of Good Friday and images associated with the source of the prayers, including stained glass windows, icons, frescoes, mosaics, and engravings from the 6th through the late 19th C.   In this way I can share with viewers much of the catalogue of public domain and royalty-free images I have assembled since launching the AIC effort in 2010 A.D.

As always, thank you for your interest in and support of the Internet-based ministry of The Anglican Internet Church.  Please consider sharing content with friends, family and others and also subscribing to the blog by click the “Follow Anglican Internet Church” tab in the right hand column.

Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

 

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Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he devotes his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

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