Trinitytide: the Teaching Season – Episode One

Holy_Spirit-Descent-Belarussian-18thC
Descent of the Holy Spirit, Russian Orthodox tempera and gilt on panel icon, 18th C., National Arts Museum of the Republic of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus.  Public Domain.

At last!  Glitches overcome (or fixed), on Wednesday morning I completed and uploaded Part 1 and Part 2 of Episode One in the newest AIC Season Video series, Trinitytide: the Teaching Season.  As noted in a previous blog posting, the episode ran too long and was split into two parts.  There is only a transition slide between the end of Part 1 and the start of Part 2 so viewers will need to watch Part 2 to hear the discussion of seasonal music for Whitsunday and Whitsun Week.

For thematic focus (after all, this is a teaching video series) I included a discussion of Whitsunday and a short history of Trinity season and its relationship to Pentecost in the new Trinitytide series.   Viewers will find an outstanding collection of illustrations in Episode One, with 15 of them on the first Pentecost.  Many are rarely seen in the Western Church, except among religious scholars and art historians.  The oldest Pentecost illustration was made in 586 A.D.  The most recent example was prepared near the end of the 19th or early in the 20th C.   Viewers will also learn about the 14th person in the Byzantine icons of Pentecost (12 Apostles, the Blessed Virgin, and — watch and find out).

Watch Episode One-Part 1.     Listen to the Podcast of Episode One-Part 1

Watch Episode One-Part 2.     Listen to the Podcast of Episode One-Part 2

Episode Two in the series will be focused on Trinity Sunday, First Sunday after Trinity and Second Sunday after Trinity, plus more seasonal music from The St. Chrysostom Hymnal.  I expect to have the episode ready next week or the following week.

As always, thanks for your interest in and support for this Internet-based ministry which seeks to teach traditional Christian doctrine and practice to the faithful wherever they live — and make it available 24/7.

May God bless you in all that you do in His Name!

Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

Published by

Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he devotes his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

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