New testament: Gospels. a progress report

Here’s a progress report on the upgrading of the New Testament: Gospels series. There are 45 episodes consisting of almost 1600 slides that must be rebuilt one-at-a-time. It’s very slow work, with six slides per page, each of which is separately trimmed to size. The primary objective is to integrate the videos series and the new The Gospel of ... series of AIC Bookstore Publications, so that visitors interested in either will be exposed to the same material in another setting or media. Every episode is getting a facelift, with some new illustrations and some changes in text and picture layouts. In the Fourth Edition, the Other AIC Resources section of each episode is being standardized across the series.

As of 12/11/20 I have remade all the slides in Episode One (the Introduction to the series); Episodes Two through Six (focused on the Gospel of Matthew); Episodes Seven through Eleven (focused on the Gospel of Mark); and Episodes Twelve through Sixteen (up to start of Jesus’ ministry in Galilee in the Gospel of Luke).

I am very pleased to let you know that the Universitats- und Landesbibliothek Darmstadt, custodians of the Hitda Codex (circa 1020 A.D.), have generously granted written permission to use the high-resolution images of Christ in Majesty; Healing the Man with a Withered Hand; Healing Peter’s Mother-in-Law; and Healing the Demon-possessed Man (or Gadarene Man) that we purchased for Gospel book series. All are used in Episode Eight (Gospel of Mark).

I have not yet overcome several issues involved in moving our videos from the current vendor to Vimeo.com. I hope these issues can be resolved in the next few days.

The next step in the process is recording the soundtrack for these 16 episodes. My plan is to start on that task tomorrow.

Published by

Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he has devoted his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s