Sixteenth Sunday After Trinity

Quite a busy week, starting with a heart catheterization on Tuesday.  I am thankful and glad to report that the test found no new blockages in my heart and no obstruction in the stent which was installed in 2013.  The most convincing theory of the moment is that my symptoms were the result of stress, lack of exercise and lack of sleep, etc.  Consequently, lifestyle changes have already been made, including regular exercise, including at least 30 minutes of walking, and regular massages at my chiropractor’s office.

There will be no new episodes in our Bible Study series on Revelation this week.  I hope to complete work on Episode 23, focused on Revelation 18, before the end of next week.  All the slides are done, as is the sound recording.  I have to coordinate the pictures and sound, tedious, time-consuming work for which had neither time nor energy for this week!  Thanks for your patience.

I am presently at work on the final Chapter of Revelation and hope to have all the episodes completed before the middle of October.

Raising the Son of the Widow of Nain, opaque watercolor over graphite on gray wove paper, James Tissot, late 19th C. Public domain by the Brooklyn Museum
Raising the Son of the Widow of Nain, opaque watercolor over graphite on gray wove paper, James Tissot, late 19th C. Public domain by the Brooklyn Museum

I did complete and upload to the AIC Web Site and Facebook my Podcast Homily for Sixteenth Sunday After Trinity.  The Gospel reading covers the Raising of the Son of the Widow of Nain (Luke 7:11-17).  The only illustration I know of is the lovely watercolor from the Life of Christ series by James Tissot at the Brooklyn Museum.

Listen to the Podcast Homily

Published by

Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he devotes his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

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