Nicene Creed – Episode Four

Nicaea_icon-Constantine-Bishops
The Emperor Constantine and the Bishops of the Council of Nicea.  Early Byzantine icon.  Artist uknown.

IN working out the content for the Nicene Creed video series I ran into a problem with the length of the episodes.  The revised format shows up in Episode Four, released today as the first of three episodes focused on the Creed’s descriptions of Jesus Christ.  Here’s the plan for all three:

  • Episode Four:  From “And in one Lord Jesus Christ” through “being of the same substance with the Father.”   There are 16 illustrations, with oldest prepared in the early 11th C. and the last being a statue sculpted in 2009 A.D.  One of the illustrations is an 18th C. copy of a 3rd or 4th C. icon from the Edessa region of Syria.  Episode length is just over 24 minutes.
  • Episode Five:  From “by whom all things were made” through “He suffered and was buried.”  There will be 11 illustrations, with the oldest being an 11th C. Russian Orthodox icon of Christ at Kiev and newest being stained glass windows and sketches of scenes in the life of Christ, both from the late 19th C.  The anticipated episode length is about 18 minutes.
  • Episode Six:  From “And on the third day” through “whose kingdom shall have no end.”   There will be material not widely understood in the Western Church tradition regarding the closing phrase, which was not part of the original Nicene Creed written at the Council of Nicea in 325 A.D.  As of today, the number of illustrations and episode length remain undecided, but the illustrations will include a remarkable early icon of the Archangel Gabriel taken from Constantinople to Moscow in the late 14th C.  The age of the icon and the identity of the artist are not know, but it is said that it had a strong influence on the work of noted icon artist Andrei Rublev, the uality of whose work has never been equalled.  Others may have painted with high skill but no one, except perhaps his contemporary Dionysius, has approached the sense of spirituality evident in his icons.

I invite you to either   Watch the Video    Or  Listen to the Podcast version.

As always, thank you for your interest and support.  Glory be to God for all things!  Amen!

Published by

Anglican Internet Church

Fr. Shibley retired from pulpit ministry at Epiphany A.D. 2014. Since then he devotes his spare time to this online ministry producing videos, podcasts and books explaining traditional Christian theology and liturgy in layman's language with a minimum of technical or theological terms, and making them available either free or at reasonable cost.

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